Registrar Documents

DLIFLC Transcript Request Form 220 DLPT ACE Credit Request Form 420 Education Verification Request AA Degree Application AA Degree General Information AA Degree Plan ACE Final Review Oct 2015 ACE Final Review 2012 Revised ACE Final Review 2012 DLPT ACE Fact...
New barracks on Presidio of Monterey dedicated to fallen Marine

New barracks on Presidio of Monterey dedicated to fallen Marine

Story by Joseph Kumzak, Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, Calif. — The Marine Corps Detachment hosted a memorialization ceremony March 1 to dedicate its new barracks to a fallen Marine and Defense Language Institute alumnus. The Presidio is lined with buildings dedicated to distinguished individuals in recognition for their courage, heroism and selfless service — such as Taylor Hall, Rasmussen Hall and Nakamura Hall. Pyeatt Barracks is Presidio’s newest building dedicated to Marine Sgt. Lucas Pyeatt who was killed in action Feb. 5, 2011 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. “For the next few decades every Marine that comes through DLI will live in this barracks. And every day when they come and go, they will walk past that plaque and see Sgt. Pyeatt’s picture and citation and be reminded of what he did … hopefully that inspires Marines for years to come,” said Lt. Col. Jason Schermerhorn, Marine Corps Detachment commander. Pyeatt studied Russian at DLI June 2008 – June 2009, then graduated the Russian Cryptologic program Sept. 11, 2009. Upon graduation, he was assigned to the II Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He was on his first deployment in Afghanistan for only two weeks when he volunteered for the mission that cost his life. “I know I can’t go on every patrol, but I need to go on the first one so I know what my Marines are going through,” he told a fellow Marine as they prepared for the mission. Pyeatt was posthumously awarded the National Intelligence Medal for Valor. Former director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper presented the award...
A friendship reconnected at DLIFLC

A friendship reconnected at DLIFLC

By Tammy Cario “You started 50 years ago last week,” Jerry Spivey said to Vincent “Vinnie” Zinck who was sitting across a classroom full of students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Jan. 14, “and I started September or October of ‘68.” Despite both attending the then Defense Language Institute West Coast Branch at the same time during the late 1960s, the two didn’t meet until they were stationed in Taiwan during the Vietnam War. “We lived in the same neighborhood in Taiwan right outside of Taipei. We just reconnected on a new thing called Facebook,” explained Jerry, a native of Georgia. The two had lost touch after going their separate ways, only to reunite, first on Facebook and then face to face in San Francisco where Vinnie and his wife live, over 40 years later. The pair decided they wanted to revisit their days at DLIFLC, the foundation of where their shared past began. The tour started with a visit to the Chinese school, a language they both learned when they joined. “Most of us who had graduated from college were afraid of getting drafted and getting sent to Vietnam in the infantry. So we figured the odds were better if we enlisted,” Vinnie explained to the students. “Back in the stone age when Jerry and I were here, there were two courses [for Chinese]. One was 39 weeks and one was 47 weeks. Jerry had the 47 week and I had the 39 week course.” Now the Chinese course has expanded to 64 weeks. And that isn’t the only thing that has changed since they...
Top Army attaché to China gives advice to FAOs

Top Army attaché to China gives advice to FAOs

By Natela Cutter The U.S. Army’s senior defense attaché at the American Embassy in Beijing, China had a few things to share with newly-minted Foreign Area Officers who are attending a week-long joint FAO course hosted by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Jan. 14-18. “It is important to understand that what you do now will set the tone for your entire career,” said Brig. Gen. Robert “Brian” Davis, the key note speaker Jan. 15 at the Presidio of Monterey. The event was attended by nearly 150 FAOs from all four branches of the service and their spouses. The week-long course is designed to offer general orientation to the FAO profession for young captains and majors who just began their new career field. The course consists of workshops with guest lecturers who are experts in the field of foreign affairs and specialize in regional political topics, operations, and security cooperation. “It is important for you to know where you are in the world, which is completely different than it was 20 years ago,” when the global balance of power was roughly divided into two spheres, between Western democracies and the former communist Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc nations. “This is a period of increasing risk, of the return of Great Power competition…” he continued, stating that the job of FAOs is even more crucial today with the continuous changing of political and economic alliances. Davis speaks from 16 years of experience, having served in China, Thailand and Taiwan. He graduated from the Chinese Mandarin Basic course at DLIFLC 23 years ago and surprised his old instructors with his...
Spc. Lingo retires from DLIFLC, embarks on new mission

Spc. Lingo retires from DLIFLC, embarks on new mission

By Natela Cutter Spc. Lingo retired from the Army Dec. 6, after three years of faithful service to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center as the institute’s mascot. On the day of his retirement, Lingo received a certificate that officially absolved him of his duties, acknowledging him for his “exemplary leadership, dedication to excellence in participating in command runs, sporadic deer chasing, and devouring treats … while keeping with the finest traditions of military service…” “I am going to miss Lingo greatly. He is such a joy to have at work, especially when you need a break,” said Theresa Bowker, a staff member at DLIFLC, who regularly walked Lingo. “Lingo has been a fantastic dog for DLI,” said DLIFLC Commandant, Col. Gary Hausman. “I joke that he is more like a cat than a large dog … until you bring out that leash and his eyes get big because he is ready to go outside,” he said. “In the mornings, he sings! He walks around the front office and howls, and it’s fun to hear because it does come across as if he is singing.” According to Hausman, Lingo’s routine included walking around to ‘say hello’ to all the staff members as they arrived in the morning. When important visitors came, Lingo would be the first to greet them at the door and promptly follow them into the commandant’s office with either a bone or toy in jaw. “When I came to work in the mornings, he would enter my office to see me and give me a nudge. And not a simple nudge! He gives you a...
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