DLIFLC gains new assistant commandant

DLIFLC gains new assistant commandant

By Tammy Cario Cols. Ricky Mills (left), Stephanie Kelley and Wiley Barnes stand at attention in a change of command ceremony held at the Presidio of Monterey June 24, 2019. (Official DoD photo by Leo Carrillo) Air Force Col. Stephanie R. Kelley accepted responsibility as the assistant commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in a change of command ceremony held at the Presidio of Monterey, June 24, 2019. Kelley also took over as the new commander of the 517th Training Group. The outgoing assistant commandant of DLIFLC, Air Force Col. Wiley L. Barnes, the former commander of the 517th, reliquished responsibility in the ceremony presided over by Air Force Col. Ricky L. Mills, the 17th Training Wing commander at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas. Kelley came to DLIFLC from Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, where she was a professor of Strategy and Security Studies in the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, a premier school for strategy. Speaking to the Airmen at Soldier Field, she said, “Language is not just interpreting, but it’s connecting the meaning” and cultural context behind it. “You will ensure that our leaders understand not only what was said but what was meant” because of their unique skillset. Later she closed her speech with, “I look forward to meeting each and every one of you…” Barnes, who is headed to the Pentagon in Crystal City, Virginia, challenged the 517th Airmen to keep improving themselves. “It is not a birthright what we are the most powerful nation on earth and the world’s most powerful Air Force. We have to earn it every...
Defense Language Institute and National Cryptologic School sign agreement

Defense Language Institute and National Cryptologic School sign agreement

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Commandant Col. Gary M. Hausman and National Cryptologic School Commandant Diane M. Janosek sign a memorandum of agreement at the Defense Language Institute June 11, allowing students to transfer credit from NCS to DLIFLC to satisfy general education requirements for receiving an AA degree in foreign language. The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center leadership signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Cryptologic School June 11, enabling service members to apply NCS completed coursework toward an Associate of Arts degree in Foreign Language granted by DLIFLC. “DLI students continue to amaze me every single day with the level of their aptitude and desire for advanced learning. This agreement provides DoD linguists with an additional opportunity to receive advanced learning credit and will advance the academic experience of the workforce,” said DLIFLC Commandant Col. Gary M. Hausman. Under the terms of the agreement, eligible students may transfer a three-credit NCS course from the general education areas of writing, mathematics, and technology. In order to obtain an AA degree from DLIFLC students must transfer 18 units in general education from an accredited institution, in addition to successfully completing their foreign language coursework which is valued at 45 units. “It’s a win-win for service members and our nation, which benefits from a well-rounded, well-educated national security and cyber workforce,” said NCS Commandant Diane M....
A dozen DLIFLC students awarded in Russian essay contest

A dozen DLIFLC students awarded in Russian essay contest

By Tammy Cario Winners for the 2019 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest proudly show their awards with their teachers after a ceremony held at the Fort Ord Department of Defense Center in Seaside, California to honor their achievements. It was in early February that 15 Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center students in the Russian program for interpreting gathered in the auditorium at the Fort Ord Department of Defense Center in Seaside, California. They were preparing to write a timed essay in a nationwide contest run by the American Council Teachers of Russian, called the 2019 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest. Iryna Worman, department chair for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, was one of the faculty members in the auditorium that day. She said that for her, the anticipation was running high. “We started winning this contest in 2013. We had two winners that year. In 2014, we had four.” The numbers kept rising each year. “Last year was eight. It’s a contest. You never know!” A teacher told them the theme: university life. From there, the students had 60 minutes to write an essay in Russian. No dictionaries, no Google. Just a pen and paper, and their year spent learning at DLIFLC. “We don’t teach writing,” explained Worman. “We are an interpreting program.” The students are tested on their listening, reading and speaking abilities. “In our program, we have classes like interpreting, translation and history. No writing classes.” The students were entered in one of three categories: those with no prior exposure to Russian, heritage speakers of other Slavic language other than Russian, or Russian heritage speakers. Almost...
Presidio honors fallen comrades for Memorial Day

Presidio honors fallen comrades for Memorial Day

By Tammy Cario On a day set aside for the nation to recognize those fallen in the line of duty, the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center honored two service members who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country in a ceremony held May 23, 2019, on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey. Col. Gary Hausman, Commandant of DLIFLC, speaks at a Memorial Day ceremony to honor two service members who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. The ceremony was held May 23, 2019, on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey. (Official DoD photo by Joseph Kumzak) “With the hectic lives we lead today, it might be easy to think of Memorial Day as merely a three-day weekend,” said Col. Gary Hausman, Commandant of DLIFLC. “It’s much more than that. It is a time for our Nation to reflect…It’s an opportunity for Americans to pay homage to those who died serving our Nation and acknowledge the immense debt we owe them and the families and loved ones they left behind.”  This year, the Presidio of Monterey is honoring two DLIFLC graduates who were killed in action. Army Staff Sgt. Alexander Conrad was born in May 11, 1992 in Mesa, Arizona. Directly after his high school graduation, Conrad joined the Army as a Human Intelligence Collector. His first duty station was Joint Base Lewis-McChord, where he deployed twice in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. His next assignment was to DLIFLC to learn French before he continued on to 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne). While on deployment June 8, 2018, Conrad was killed by enemy fire in Somalia....
Thousands come to Language Day and learn the international language of dance

Thousands come to Language Day and learn the international language of dance

By the Mission Public Affairs Office, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Over 6,000 people attended Language Day, an annual event hosted by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center held at the Presidio of Monterey, May 10. Tents with different country demonstrations and international food covered Soldier Field while cultures from around the globe were on display on the field and in the classrooms. Soldier Field is busy with visitors May 10, for Language Day 2019. Now in its 67th year, Language Day is hosted by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center at the Presidio of Monterey. Once a year, the Presidio opens its gates in welcome to visitors from far and wide to showcase what the students here are learning in language, culture and communication. One of the main elements of Language Day is the stage performances, the majority of which are dances. If over 70 percent of communication is nonverbal, then dance is the international language that transcends all barriers. Detlev Kesten, associate provost for academic support and co-emcee for Language Day for the fourth year running, thinks dance is a way to show how much people have in common. “To me, dancing and music brings people together. You can dance along as well as sing along, even if you don’t know the words. That’s what brings you closer to the culture and to each other.” The visitors, which included students, educators and visitors from all over California and more than a dozen other states, were able to watch over 50 stage performances, most of them traditional dances. Because the instructors represent over 90 different...
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