Tagalog teacher favors DLIFLC after meeting linguists

Tagalog teacher favors DLIFLC after meeting linguists

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – It is an unseasonably hot day in April on the Presidio of Monterey, California, and Marites Castro’s students are jumping off desks. The Tagalog language teacher does not discourage them. She shouts praises and encourages them to keep going. “Last year we did a bamboo traditional Singkil dance originating from the Lanao provinces located in Mindanao, southern Philippines, but this year we will do the bench dance. It will be very good. You’ll see,” said Castro, who teaches the most common language of the Philippines. About a month away is Language Day, the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center’s annual open house and showcase for multiple languages and cultures from around the world. Students practice in their spare time a dance or custom from the culture they are studying to present on Language Day. “These students are new, but on Language Day they’ll be ready,” said Castro. Castro, who is from Manila’s metropolitan area, loves teaching so much that she left her home and her close-knit family in the Philippines for the U.S. so that she could teach Tagalog. “My parents were very into education. They valued it and no matter how simple life was, they wanted us to get to college,” said Castro, who has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Santo Tomas and a law degree. She was working on her thesis for a Master of Arts in Special Education at the University of the Philippines prior to coming to the U.S. “It is a value in the Philippines that you help one another,” Castro...
Retired general recalls largest military sex scandal

Retired general recalls largest military sex scandal

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Retired Maj. Gen. Robert Shadley spoke at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, California, about sexual harassment/assault response and prevention during the institute’s quarterly SHARP training Feb. 19. “I speak to groups about eradicating the cancer of sexual harassment and assault from their organizations,” said Shadley to about 250 Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines at the Post Theater. Shadley, the former commander of the U.S. Army Ordnance Center and School, then located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, unraveled the largest military sex scandal to date in 1996. Known as the “Game ala military,” an entire network of senior instructors were in competition to prey on young female trainees at the ordnance school. “We found that it was easy to cut down on trainee-on-trainee misconduct, but one day a first sergeant intercepted a love note from a trainee to her drill sergeant,” said Shadley. The investigation that followed had a snowball effect, eventually leading to charges against officers and enlisted Soldiers around the U.S. including Sgt. Maj. of the Army Gene McKinney, the highest-ranking enlisted Soldier. In 2010, after believing that little has improved in preventing sexual harassment and assault in the military, Shadley wrote a book, The GAMe – Unraveling a Military Sex Scandal, about these incidents at Aberdeen. “If you take care of your people, reward the good and correct the bad, the mission will be achieved and you and your organization will succeed,” said Shadley. Shadley was followed by skits from each of the services with winners receiving a copy of his book....
FAO program guest speaker on US-Korea Alliance

FAO program guest speaker on US-Korea Alliance

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Retired Korean Maj. Gen. Lee Seo-young, now a professor at the Korea National Defense University, spoke about the alliance between the U.S. and Korea to students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Feb. 10. Lee gave his presentation, titled the Republic of Korea – U.S. Alliance: Past, Present and Future, to students at the institute’s Asian School II in Korean and then again later in English to the Foreign Area Officers. Speaking to the FAOs, “You are the experts between the U.S. and the country in which you serve,” said Lee, who served as a Defense Attaché for Korea in Washington, D.C., where he often worked on issues related to the alliance. Korea and the U.S. have maintained a bilateral Alliance for more than 60 years. Born out of the Korean War, the alliance grew stronger, both during and after the Cold War. Today, both nations “go together,” as their slogan suggests, to meet the security challenges of Northeast Asia. Beginning his presentation, Lee spoke about what he learned while researching alliances. “Most alliances last no more than 10 years,” said Lee. “The Republic of Korea – U.S. Alliance has lasted for 60.” In the first stage of the alliance during the 1950-1953 Korean War under the United Nations Command, Gen. Douglas MacArthur commanded all U.N. forces fighting in Korea. Afterwards, Seoul and Washington signed a mutual defense treaty authorizing further stationing of U.S. troops in Korea....
TRADOC commanding generals says DLIFLC is an example for Army University

TRADOC commanding generals says DLIFLC is an example for Army University

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Gen. David Perkins, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Eustis, Virginia, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Feb. 9. Perkins visited a classroom in the institute’s Middle East I school where he interacted with some of the students who are learning Arabic. Afterwards, he spoke about DLIFLC as an example in the upcoming Army University, which will be a premier learning institution that prepares Soldiers and civilians to win in the future security environment. “Something we are trying to increase and propagate in the Army is that we want you to continue your education and your level of self-development,” said Perkins. “For the rest of your life we want you to build tools to stay connected to the community of learning, and I think DLIFLC is really setting a great example of how we do that.” Since 2002, service members attending the institute have been able to earn an accredited Associate of Arts degree in foreign language upon successful graduation from their program. Nearly 12,000 associate degrees have been awarded since DLIFLC became accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The Army has succeeded in making it possible for students to receive the two-year college degree with 45 DLIFLC credits and 18 units transferred from other accredited institutions or authorized sources. “In many ways, DLIFLC is a part of an example we want to propagate throughout the rest of the Army in that...
Former DLIFLC instructor speaks about UN

Former DLIFLC instructor speaks about UN

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Kim Sung-lim, a former Korean instructor at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and now a security coordination officer within the department of safety and security at the United Nations, returned to DLIFLC to speak about the U.N. Jan. 28-29. Kim spoke about the role of the U.N. in monitoring the human rights situation in North Korea and presented on the first day to Foreign Area Officers and Military Language Instructors and the second day with students attending the institute’s  Korean school. “There is no parallel in the contemporary world to the level of human rights abuse in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” said Kim. For decades, North Korea has remained at the top or near top of all measures of state repression. The U.N. General Assembly has condemned North Korea for human rights abuses annually since 2003. “The U.N. is expected to be impartial even as a humanitarian agency, but in some cases it must execute justice,” said Kim, who feels very strongly about human rights abuses in North Korea. Human rights abuse is only one of many issues the U.N. must deal with on North Korean. A nuclear test was detected in the north of the country in early January. The U.N. Security Council quickly held an emergency meeting at the request of South Korea and decided to increase economic sanctions against the North. In 1945, the U.N. was established to prevent war, but it approved use of force in two situations: Korea in 1950 and Iraq in 1990. North and South Korea signed an...
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