Monterey officials tour DLIFLC and Presidio

Monterey officials tour DLIFLC and Presidio

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Retired U.S. Army Col. Dino Pick, former commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and now the deputy city manager for plans and public works for the City of Monterey, visited the Presidio of Monterey, California, Sept. 10. Pick, along with three other city officials who had not visited the installation prior, got an up-close look at how the Presidio operates and the language teaching mission that takes place. The officials received a briefing from DLIFLC Chief of Staff, Steven Collins, and visited the Persian Farsi School where they were given a classroom demonstration by students in Farsi. “What you do is amazing,” said Pick as he spoke to the students in Farsi which he studied in college. While attending DLIFLC in the mid-1990s, Pick studied Arabic. The officials then observed Persian Farsi students cooking at the Weckerling Center and even got a taste of Persian food. Aside from teaching the language, instructors also teach culture, history and geography of their native lands. Col. Paul Fellinger, Presidio of Monterey garrison commander, briefed the officials on the “Monterey Model,” a model of efficiency for the Department of Defense, saving the government more than $1.5 million over the past five years by partnering with the city for services and public works. The city officials also toured the nearby Naval Postgraduate School as part of Monterey’s goal of gaining a better understanding of local military installations and their...
Air Force deputy chief for intelligence visits DLIFLC

Air Force deputy chief for intelligence visits DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The U.S. Air Force deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, Lt. Gen. Robert P. Otto, returned to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Sept. 8 in his first visit since 2012. Otto was accompanied by Theresa Sanchez, the deputy senior language authority for the U.S. Air Force. They discussed some of the challenges of language training with DLIFLC academic leaders, asking questions about how to recruit and retain the best qualified teachers and ways to increase student proficiency in the future. Otto and Sanchez observed language training at DLIFLC’s Middle East School III and interacted with students studying Arabic. “This is the first time I got to jump into a language classroom and see how all of this works. I am very impressed by all you are able to accomplish,” said Otto to the students. “I can tell you, we need you,” he continued. “There will be exciting things ahead for you in your careers as linguists.” Otto also thanked the teachers and the support staff for their efforts. DLIFLC is regarded as one of the finest schools for foreign language instruction in the world. The institute provides resident instruction in 23 languages to approximately 3,500 military service members, five days a week, seven hours per day, with two to three hours of homework each night. Generally, students spend between 26 and 64 weeks at the Presidio, depending on the difficulty of the...
Awards presented for DoD’s Command Language Program of the Year and Professional of the Year

Awards presented for DoD’s Command Language Program of the Year and Professional of the Year

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif., – The Commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Col. Phillip Deppert, and Command Sgt. Maj. Matildo Coppi, presented awards Sept. 1 to the winners of the Department of Defense’s best Command Language Program and Command Language Professional of the Year. “I am honored, and even more humbled to be here today to present these awards. You as individual Language Program Managers, and the organizations you represent really make up a ’team of teams,’ that keep the entire Defense Language Program alive and vital. It could not happen without each and every one of you. I couldn’t be prouder of what you do.” said Deppert. Members of all four branches of the Services and DoD civilians gathered at DLIFLC’s Weckerling Center, at the Presidio of Monterey, to attend the Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held from Sept. 1-3, during which the awards are traditionally presented. Each year, more than 150 foreign language program managers attend the course to glean knowledge about the trends in foreign language acquisition and new products offered to military service members to better maintain and improve their foreign language skills. “There is no end to the language pedestal,” said Cheryl Houser, National Security Agency Senior Language Authority and guest speaker at the event. “Just as you get to the top, the bar will rise. And you will be surprised at how you will make it over the top every time.” The winner of the DoD’s best Command Language Program of the Year was the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command’s 500th Military Intelligence...
TRADOC deputy talks culture and language at DLIFLC

TRADOC deputy talks culture and language at DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Lt. Gen. Kevin W. Mangum, the deputy commanding general and chief of staff of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Eustis, Virginia, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Sept. 2. “There is a lack of language proficiency in the Army. Having men and women who better understand the culture, and certainly speak the language, as we engage populations across the world is critical,” said Mangum, during his first time visit to the institute since he was appointed to his new position at TRADOC in 2014. “Language is the driver to understanding a culture,” Mangum said, as he commended the native-speaking DLIFLC faculty who already provide a level of cultural awareness as they teach language in the classroom. A career aviator, with overseas deployments to Korea, Honduras, the Persian Gulf, Turkey, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq, Mangum recognizes the crucial role that cultural training and language familiarization play for the warfighter. “With the outreach programs that DLI has, we could certainly provide better cultural awareness and some basic language skills to the operating force,” said Mangum. “We must make them more culturally aware and provide as much regional expertise as we can.” Turning from cultural awareness to training more proficient professional linguists, Mangum spoke briefly about the value of overseas immersion training opportunities and the benefit students gain from the experience. “It’s one thing to sit in a classroom at the Presidio of Monterey and talk about other cultures and languages, but putting it into context and perspective in the...
Air Force Special Operations School commandant learns about DLIFLC

Air Force Special Operations School commandant learns about DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Lt. Col. Daniel Roesch, U.S. Air Force Special Operations School commandant, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Sept. 1. The Special Operations School, located at Hulbert Field, Florida, consists of four divisions, one being a language center, which shares the mission of DLIFLC – to provide culturally based language education. Roesch visited DLIFLC to learn how the institute operates and possibly learn new ways to better provide foreign language training to meet the Air Force’s language requirements for special operations forces. “It’s great to see all of this from the top down. As a Japanese student in 2009-2010 I, of course, was at the bottom looking up,” said Roesch. During his visit senior DLIFLC leadership briefed Roesch on the institute’s goals to reach higher proficiency levels, distance learning capabilities and online learning materials. He also toured the Directorate of Continuing Education and learned about isolation immersion opportunities. “We had no Japanese immersions in my time here,” said Roesch, who later spent time in Japan after DLIFLC. “Just having that immersion experience brought my (language test) score up a plus, so I know it’s helpful.” On Sept. 2, Roesch visited his old stomping grounds, the DLIFLC Japanese department where he spoke to several of his instructors and addressed a class of Japanese language students. “This is a great opportunity for you, take advantage of it, and maintain your language. When you graduate, you will be at the top of your game, and it will be up to you to make sure that...
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