Commandant says farewell at faculty potluck luncheon

Commandant says farewell at faculty potluck luncheon

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – More than 150 faculty and staff of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center said farewell to Col. David K. Chapman, DLIFLC commandant, during a luncheon at Khalil Hall on the Presidio of Monterey, California, July 16. “Thank you faculty for all you do. You made my job so much easier. All those great ideas came from you. All I had to do was go along with it,” said Chapman, referring to some of the academic initiatives he spearheaded with faculty input. “A three-time grad of DLIFLC, a true professional, and a very caring and compassionate person are all the more reasons we will miss Col. Chapman,” said DLIFLC Chief of Staff, Steve Collins. “We know he will stay in touch and will be looking to see if we can keep the momentum going on the many great initiatives he started.” Although serving as commandant for only about a year, Chapman has been very busy with many initiatives that effect students and faculty and better the institute. Even after his change of command, scheduled for July 29, Chapman plans to remain an advocate for DLIFLC, in support of the institute’s future success. “We thank you for your genuine concern for our faculty and students, for hosting faculty luncheons, for visiting the schools, and augmenting our overseas immersion program,” said Dr. Jim Zhao, associate provost of Undergraduate Education. Although the faculty played host for Chapman at the potluck luncheon, he hosted faculty members for lunch in his home on a monthly basis throughout his year in command in order to...
C Co., 229MI changes command

C Co., 229MI changes command

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Captain Shawn Zima assumed command of Charlie Co., 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, from Capt. Austin Holdridge on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey, California, July 2. In his outgoing remarks, Holdridge complimented his soldiers on their perseverance and dedication to becoming proficient military linguists. He also thanked the leadership of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion for their support during his one-year command tour. Zima, in his first remarks to the company upon assuming command, said that he has some big shoes to fill after Holdridge but sees the challenge as an opportunity. The 229th Military Intelligence Battalion assigned to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center facilitates the production of qualified warrior linguists and sustains soldiers and their families to support the operational...
CALMED trains for life flight

CALMED trains for life flight

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – California Shock Trauma Air Rescue (CALSTAR) gave an orientation and overview of one of their helicopters at California State University – Monterey Bay July 2. Participants included first responders from the Monterey area and medics from the California Medical Detachment (CALMED). CALMED operates the health clinic for service members assigned to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language and the Presidio of Monterey. During the training, the medics learned how to load a patient onto a CALSTAR helicopter if the need should ever occur. The time it takes to receive emergency medical treatment can mean the difference between life and death. CALSTAR can rapidly transport trauma patients via air ambulance to a major medical...
Institute welcomes new assistant commandant

Institute welcomes new assistant commandant

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Colonel Ginger Wallace relinquished responsibility of her position as assistant commandant at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center during a change of command ceremony June 26 on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey, California. Colonel Keith Logeman assumed responsibility as DLIFLC assistant commandant, which also includes command of the U.S. Air Force’s 517th Training Group. “I am passionate about this institute and this training group. I am convinced you are the right person to take both organizations to even bigger successes,” said Wallace to Logeman. “I have known Ginger since we were captains at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, and the last ten days she’s continued to teach me about this amazing institute as she did then,” said Logeman. Wallace also thanked DLIFLC instructors for teaching students more than six to seven hours per day. “You are the heart and soul of this institute,” she said. As assistant commandant, Wallace was responsible for more than 1,800 faculty members and 250 joint-service staff providing language training and operational support. As Commander of the 517th Training Group, she lead two squadrons composed of 1,200 Airmen, the majority of whom are cryptologic linguists. For her leadership and service, Wallace was awarded the Legion of Merit, one of the U.S. Armed Forces’ highest awards, from Col. Kimberlee Joos, commander of the 17th Training Wing, Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, which is responsible for the 517th Training Group. Logeman will assume these same responsibilities from Wallace, but first thanked his family for their patience in the many moves that military families must endure....
From the Korean War to K-pop, Korean speech contest has it all

From the Korean War to K-pop, Korean speech contest has it all

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Korean School at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, California, held the 13th Annual Korean Speech Contest June 26. The contest provides students with an opportunity to showcase their Korean language ability and cultural awareness. Lance Cpl. Ean Johansen won first place with his speech titled “A Marine’s Korean love” where he spoke about his enjoyment of Korean popular music known as K-pop. “I think that students who listen to K-pop learn Korean better than students who do not listen to K-pop,” said Johansen in Korean during his speech. Johansen, who is three months into the Korean program, was recognized on stage by DLIFLC Commandant Col. David Chapman and received his first-place certificate. “I did really well in high school and I came here and thought Korean would be hard but not too bad. At the end of the first unit I was blown away,” said Johansen about studying Korean. “It’s amazing how much we do every day, but after three months I can hold conversations with native Koreans.” Seaman Martina Wilson won second place with her speech titled “A division of Korea and unification.” Wilson went on an overseas immersion to Korea to gain a better understanding of the language and culture. While there she conducted a survey on reunification of North and South Korea and used the results in her speech. “I spoke about the changing attitude towards the reunification of Korea,” said Wilson. “My project while in Korea was an opinion poll of what Koreans thought about reunification. I was stunned...
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