“Leadership principles of a loyal heretic”

“Leadership principles of a loyal heretic”

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Col. Wiley Barnes, the assistant commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and commander of the U.S. Air Force 517th Training Group, spoke at an institute leadership forum to staff and faculty Jan. 25. Barnes titled his talk “Leadership principles of a loyal heretic” and made several book recommendations to support the subject of leadership. “A loyal heretic is a person loyal to the Nation, his service and mission while challenging the status quo in a constructive way,” said Barnes, who uses the Webster Dictionary definition of heretic as “one who differs in opinion from an accepted belief or doctrine.” Barnes did not coin the phrase himself, but attributes it to Lt. Gen. Paul K. Carlton, Jr., the 17th Surgeon General of the Air Force. Carlton had spoken to a class of officer candidates at the Officer Training School at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, while Barnes was serving as an instructor there from 2002-2003. A loyal heretic is a way of thinking, according to Barnes, who then challenged the staff and faculty to “not just do what you’re told, but be informed of the situation or mission and make positive change.” He said they must adhere to five leadership characteristics or principle and five disciplines to do so. The leadership characteristics or principles are experience, education, natural talent or intellect, vision, and courage. The disciplines are mutual respect for others, doing the right thing for the right reason, leading by example, continuously improving and adapting systems thinking. Barnes offered a book recommendation with respect to the...
Only in America – One family – nearly 60 years of service

Only in America – One family – nearly 60 years of service

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – In the early years of DLIFLC, when it was called the Army Language School, Russian teachers were recruited from various communities around the country. One teacher who accepted the job offer to teach Russian, was Mr. Nikolai Marchenko, who traveled with his family to Monterey from New York by Greyhound bus. His wife, Mrs. Natalia Marchenko, with limited English skills, took on various jobs in the community, including packing fish on Cannery Row, and working as a dishwasher in the chow hall. At her retirement party on Dec. 5, 2017, their daughter, Dr. Natalie Marchenko-Fryberger, recollected a family story her mother loved to tell: “One morning, a full-bird colonel returned his breakfast because he did not like the way the eggs were cooked. The manager of the chow hall, instead of bringing him his new order, asked my mother to go “give it to the damn bird.”  My mother, with her 0+ English skills, walked around reading name tags. When she couldn’t locate the name, she stood in front of the room, and in her thick accent loudly asked “Who is Mister Damn Bird?”  As expected, the entire room burst into laughter when a red-faced colonel stood up and identified himself.  My mother was scared to death. She grew up in the Ukraine under Communism, then lived under Nazi occupation, and in a Labor Camp in Germany. She knew what it meant to insult an officer. However, this colonel stood next to her in front of everyone, took the plate, smiled, and asked her about her family and how...
Academic Senate takes lead on shared governance

Academic Senate takes lead on shared governance

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Everyone at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center knows that the Commandant’s preferred venue of interaction with faculty, staff and students is face-to-face, normally conducted through Town Halls, or on his well-known weekly walks to the school houses. On most occasions during the Town Halls, Col. Phil Deppert, DLIFLC Commandant, will ask the assembled group “what are we for?,” normally eliciting a loud answer by the audience – “for the students!,” in reference to more than 2,500 military service members who learn one of the 17 foreign languages taught at DLIFLC. Today, however, Deppert turns to the first row in the auditorium, spots a dark-eyed young man and hollers, “Aziz, come up here and tell the faculty and staff what you are for!” “I am for the faculty Sir,” says Aziz Popal, a confident-looking young man in his early 30s, well dressed and sporting a brilliant white smile. Popal is the new Academic Senate president who turned the organization around over the past year into a model of shared governance between faculty, staff, and the Institute leadership. In 2016, Deppert directed a review of shared governance, to analyze the extent to which DLIFLC groups were fulfilling their stated purpose and mission, with the intent of creating a clear pathway for faculty and staff members to have their voices heard in the Institute’s decision-making processes. “Shared governance has been reenergized,” said Popal, in an interview, explaining that these efforts had fallen by the way side in recent years and that the Academic Senate and Faculty Advisory Councils had lost...
Master Educator Course prepares service members to teach

Master Educator Course prepares service members to teach

By 1st Sgt. Sean Cherland Senior Training Developer, Faculty Development   MONTEREY, Calif. – Military service members in Monterey, California are taking advantage of their military training as foreign language instructors and are applying their experience toward achieving higher education degrees through the University of Louisville, Kentucky. Staff from the University of Louisville visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Oct. 27 to observe foreign language classes being conducted by half a dozen Military Language Instructors who are enrolled in their program. “I feel very fortunate to be able to pursue my Master Degree in Higher Education through the University of Louisville by using my experience from DLI. There was a two-month in-residence part of the course which I found useful to bring back to my students,” said Sgt. Baojun Marie Cui, who teaches Chinese. The University of Louisville offers 15 credits toward a Master of Arts in Higher Education Administration and an 8-week accelerated resident track to complete the graduate degree.  Awarded credits include material focusing on program development and assessment, teaching and learning styles, and instructional strategies.  The program was designed by the Department of Educational Leadership, Evaluation and Organizational Development at Fort Knox, Kentucky, with the intent to support Army University, a nascent Army organization that focuses on providing college credit and credentialing to Soldiers for their military education and experience. “The emphasis here is on excellence in teaching and learning,” said Dr. Megan Pifer, assistant director for College for Education and Human Development, who observed Cui’s instruction in Chinese to military service students aiming to become professional linguists. “It gives me a chance to...
Getting to 2+/2+/2: by 2022

Getting to 2+/2+/2: by 2022

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – After 9/11, one thing became abundantly clear to the intelligence community – there is a dire need for more and better qualified linguists. Seven months later, in April 2002, then National Security Agency director, Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden, issued a memo establishing the Interagency Roundtable Level standard for Cryptologic Language Analysts to perform assignments to a 3/3 Level. He acknowledged this meant “adjustments in training, assignments and numbers of billets. These adjustments will not be easy, but they are absolutely essential,” he stated. “As staff directly involved in the training of CLAs, we took this memo very seriously and started planning accordingly, said Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Chief of Staff, Steven Collins. To reach these new standards, DLIFLC decreased the teacher-student ratio, introduced innovative technology in the classroom, improved curriculum, trained instructors to teach at  higher levels, and increased its presence worldwide through Language Training Detachments, Mobile Training Teams, and online learning products. “Essentially, we have been working toward this goal for years, but now we have direct support at the highest decision-maker levels,” explained Collins. In May 2016, to meet the NSA standard, the Department of Defense Senior Language Authority directed DLIFLC to change its basic course graduation standard to 2+ in both listening and reading by September 30, 2022. “It is important to understand that the new DOD Instruction 5160.70 states that the CLA requirement is 3/3,” emphasized Collins. On Oct. 1, 2016, DLIFLC Commandant, Col. Phil Deppert, directed all faculty, staff, students and military cadre in the Undergraduate Education Schools to work closely together...
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