Alumnus makes final parachute jump in 75th anniversary demonstration event

Alumnus makes final parachute jump in 75th anniversary demonstration event

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Master Sgt. Sunnydale Hyde will be returning to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center for the third time Nov. 4, only this time he will jump from the sky as a member of the Black Daggers, the official U.S. Army Special Operations Command parachute demonstration team. “Being back at DLI as a representative of USASOC is an incredible honor and it is especially significant since this is my last jump as an Army parachute demonstrator,” said Hyde. The demonstration jump is part of the Institute’s celebration in November of its 75th anniversary as the provider of culturally-based foreign language education, training and sustainment for the Department of Defense dating back to 1941. Hyde graduated in 1999 from the Basic Persian-Farsi Course at the Institute. Then he returned in 2005 to serve as an initial entry training Drill Sergeant until 2007. Like many alumni, he has fond memories of his time at the Institute. “DLI taught me the value of teamwork and the importance of interpersonal relationships.  As difficult as DLI may be, working together is a vital key to success,” said Hyde. “The teamwork I learned as a private at DLI is a pivotal point to success in the world’s greatest special operations environment.” Hyde went on to use his Persian-Farsi language skills in Army special operations units. He continued his education by completing a Bachelor of Arts in Middle Eastern Languages and History, and is currently working on a master’s in leadership. After winning the 2013 Special Forces NCO of the Year Competition, Hyde was rewarded with...
Korean students celebrate Hangul Day with alphabet contest

Korean students celebrate Hangul Day with alphabet contest

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Korean School at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated Hangul Day, or Alphabet Day, with the 14th Annual Korean Alphabet Day Video Contest in September 2016. The best three videos were shown at an awards ceremony on the Presidio of Monterey Oct. 6. Awards were also given for participation in the 25th Annual Korean Language Writing Contest for Foreign Nationals hosted by Yonsei University in Seoul that judged the entries. Seaman Kaylah Blackman won first place in the writing contest with her story “The Influence of Gloomy News,” and read it aloud at the awards ceremony. “Just like how Neil Armstrong walked on the moon or how Korea became independent from Japan’s colonization and repression, times of cheerful and exhilarating news filled our world…” read Blackman in Korean at the ceremony. She continued, “They say that the influence of tragic news affects one’s mental health…” “It took me more than six hours to write this essay because I had to figure out how to make the Korean sound more articulate by using different words, so it took a really long time,” said Blackman after the ceremony. “A week later I found out I got first place.” Blackman was very fortunate to be assigned the Korean language because it was what she wanted to study. “I’ve always wanted to study Korean. I’ve studied on-and-off on my own for two years by myself. I had no teacher or textbook,” Blackman also said, who comes from a rural area of California. She watched Korean dramas and tried to follow...
Awards presented for Command Language Program and Professional of the Year

Awards presented for Command Language Program and Professional of the Year

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Col. Phil Deppert, presented awards to the winners of the Department of Defense best Command Language Program and Command Language Professional of the Year Sept. 27. Members of all four branches of the Services and DOD civilians gathered at the Weckerling Center, at the Presidio of Monterey, to attend the Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held from Sept. 27-29, during which the awards are traditionally presented. U.S. Army policy states that units that are assigned linguists must maintain a command language program and provided several hours per week for linguists to train to maintain their language. More than 150 command language program managers attend the course each year to glean knowledge about the trends in foreign language acquisition and new products offered to military service members to better maintain and improve their foreign language skills. The winner of the DOD’s best Command Language Program of the Year for 2015 was the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command’s 704th Military Intelligence Brigade at Fort Meade, Maryland. The award was received by Col. Rhett Cox, brigade commander, and Selena Heckman, the Command Language Program Manager. Heckman is a 2012 graduate of DLIFLC in Korean and is also a Soldier-linguist in the Army National Guard. She has been with the 704th MI as a Department of the Army Civilian since February. “I was lucky to come in with an unbiased and outsider’s view of the program. The statistics, the numbers on paper, show how over the past five years the 704th...
Master Sergeant loves mentoring, giving back

Master Sergeant loves mentoring, giving back

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Though the U.S. Army has taught him much, if there is one thing in particular that Master Sgt. Mike Gabino has learned from the Army is that everybody has the ability to learn if you have the right instructor. That is why he strives to be the “right instructor” to his Soldiers as he gives back what the Army has given to him – opportunities. Gabino is fluent in Spanish and has served in the Army since 1993. He is the noncommissioned officer in charge of Undergraduate Education at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center at the Presidio of Monterey, California, which is regarded as one of the finest schools for foreign language instruction in the Nation. All basic foreign language teaching at the institute takes place in undergraduate education. “Part of being an NCO is to be a teacher able to coach, mentor and develop others,” said Gabino, which is standard throughout the Army, but at DLIFLC the stakes are higher. Considered one of the toughest challenges in the Department of Defense, the language school places enormous pressure on students from across the services – Army, Marine Corps, Navy and Air Force – to succeed in only a limited amount of time. Proficiency standards for military linguists are high and getting higher. Students spend up to seven hours a day in class, followed by three hours or more of homework each night. Weekends are filled with extra studying, and that does not include the day-to-day requirements of being a service member. Dependent upon the language being learned,...
24th Korean Day Cultural Festival in San Francisco

24th Korean Day Cultural Festival in San Francisco

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   SAN FRANCISCO – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center commandant, joint-service color guard and fan dance team from the Korean School participated in the 24th Korean Day Cultural Festival in San Francisco Sept. 17. Col. Phil Deppert, commandant, spoke on behalf of the institute at the festival, commending the Korean-American community for their work and contributions made to the Nation and thanked them for allowing DLIFLC to take part in the celebration. See more...
FAO program guest speaker on the India-Pakistan dyad

FAO program guest speaker on the India-Pakistan dyad

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Dr. Sharad Joshi, an assistant professor of nonproliferation and terrorism studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey, spoke to Foreign Area Officers in language training at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Sept. 14 about relations between India and Pakistan. In his presentation “Assessing the India-Pakistan Dyad,” Joshi spoke about why this issue is important within U.S. National Security Strategy. The U.S. identifies a plethora of problems in Asia as it continues its rebalance to Asia and the Pacific, according to the strategy. In South Asia, the U.S. works with both India and Pakistan to promote strategic stability, combat terrorism, and advance regional economic integration in South and Central Asia. “In this partnership we always have to consider the other power,” said Joshi, referring to India and Pakistan as a hyphenated partnership. “For example, one cannot just go to Islamabad or just go to New Delhi without going to the other.” The problem herein is that India and Pakistan have been at odds with each other since the British Partition of India of 1947, which created India and the Dominion of Pakistan, later splitting into Pakistan and Bangladesh. Since then, India and Pakistan fought wars with each other from 1947-1948, in 1965, and in 1999. Kashmir, the disputed northernmost province of India, is at the heart of the tensions between the two countries. The vastly-Muslim province has religious and cultural ties to Pakistan, but is...
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