Lifetime of competition readies NCO for award of a lifetime

Lifetime of competition readies NCO for award of a lifetime

By Brian Lepley Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – The eight other candidates for the Army’s 2017 AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year can blame Leesa Brotherton. Staff Sgt. Bryan Ivery, the PSOY winner named at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, Sept. 15, credits his hyper-competitiveness to his aunt Leesa. “We grew up together and she was 10 years older than me. We played all kinds of games and she showed me no mercy,” remembers Ivery. “I learned. Since I was young I have to bring my best to any competition I’m in.” “Iron sharpens iron” is Ivery’s motto, an ethos born from those losses to Brotherton as a child. His duty at Company B, 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, is preparing new arrivals for the academic rigor of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. “Motivation is definitely a driving factor in my day-to-day activities with these new Soldiers,” said Ivery, one of five platoon sergeants for the battalion’s Phase Four training. Co. B 1st Sgt. Clint Rowe and Ivery are products of DLIFLC, a joint service school where students can spend more than 18 months learning languages, dialects and cultures like Farsi, Arabic, Korean, Urdu and many others. “Staff Sgt. Ivery gets Soldiers right out of basic and brings them up to the level DLI and the Army needs them to be in order to succeed,” Rowe said. “His dedication and grit are paramount.” The Army AIT PSOY event, run by Training and Doctrine Command, was modeled on a hectic combat mission and tested that motivation, Ivery said. It was five days of strenuous tasks on a punishing schedule....
First Army Instructor Badge Recognition at DLIFLC

First Army Instructor Badge Recognition at DLIFLC

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – “I believe the Army recognized it for what it is, and as a result I was selected for promotion to sergeant first class,” said Staff Sgt. Garrick Bartlett, who is a MLI in the Multi-Language School and has been recognized three times as the military instructor of the quarter, while simultaneously pursuing his Master degree in higher education. MLIs are a vital part of the education construct at DLIFLC, where eight separate foreign language schools are managed by a mix of military and civilian instructors and leadership. MLIs not only teach the foreign language in the schools, but also manage student linguist careers and maintain open channels of communication between civilian management and military units. “Our goal was to validate the role of the MLIs as instructors Army-wide and align them directly with their leader peers,” said Sgt. 1st Class Sean Cherland, adding that it is vital that Army “leadership outside of DLI is aware of their qualifications as instructors.” “Historically, the role of MLIs is not well understood outside of DLI and was seldom acknowledged by TRADOC. They only received a local badge….and didn’t have anything that recognized them Army-wide,” Cherland said. In the making for more than two years, the key to success for the program was the enabling of the MLI’s to complete the Army Training and Doctrine Command course called the Foundation Instructor Facilitator Course, which is designed to train new instructors on how facilitate basic courses and learn instructional techniques. In the making for more than two years, the key to success for the program was the...
FAO program guest speaker discusses democracy issues in Africa

FAO program guest speaker discusses democracy issues in Africa

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly U.S. Army officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Nicholas Tomb, program manager of the Center for Civil-Military Relations Africa Program at the Naval Postgraduate School, in Monterey, spoke to U.S. Army Foreign Area Officers in language training at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Sept. 20, about Africa. Tomb titled his talk “Beyond Democracy in Africa” and began by asking FAOs what is the definition of democracy. FAOs suggested ideas of government ruled by the people, equality and freedom. Tomb shared the lengthy United Nations definition of democracy, but dwelled on the concept of representative governance – the manner of governing in which the people determine their political, economic, social and cultural systems. He followed with an anecdote to show the low quality of representative governance in African countries. “Mo Ibrahim, Sudanese businessman and telecom magnate, offers the Mo Ibrahim Award to any African president that steps down from power at the end of his term,” said Tomb. Since 2006, only four African leaders have been honored with the $5 million award, proving the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership to be one of the world’s most exclusive awards. Tomb continued, “The fact that so few African leaders have accepted the award and stood down demonstrates the fact of how much money is to be made by staying in power.” “There’s this perception that Africa is a very poor place and there are certainly a lot of poor people, but in reality, it...
Kiwanis Club gives awards to civilian and military faculty

Kiwanis Club gives awards to civilian and military faculty

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Kiwanis Club of Monterey honored two Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center faculty at their monthly meeting in downtown Monterey Sept. 13. Dr. Gamal Kalini received the Civilian Instructor of the Year award and Tech Sgt. Ryan Best received the Military Language Instructor of the Year award. The awards are representative of the partnership between the Institute and the greater Monterey community. Kalini, originally from Cairo, Egypt, has worked for the Institute since 2007. “Dr. Kalini is so dedicated to his profession that he regularly shares his research and work with colleagues through workshops and presentations at various faculty development events at DLIFLC and beyond,” said Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of the Institute. Best, who joined the U.S. Air Force in 2006, studied both basic and intermediate Mandarin Chinese at the Institute before becoming the Chief Military Language Instructor at the Institute’s Asian School I, the Chinese School. “Aside from all his accomplishments, Tech. Sgt. Best also holds the highest DLPT score within the Air Force, with a 3+/3/2+ in Chinese Mandarin – which puts him in the top one percent of Air Force linguists,” said Deppert. Kiwanis International was founded in 1915 by a group of businessmen in Detroit, Michigan. The name “Kiwanis” was coined from an expression in a Native American language of the Detroit area, “Nunc Kee-wanis,” which means, “We trade.” In 1920, the motto of Kiwanis became “We Build.” It remained the motto until 2005, when members voted to change it to “serving the children of the world.” The Kiwanis Club of Monterey, founded...
St. Jerome becomes patron of military linguists

St. Jerome becomes patron of military linguists

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – During a humble ceremony at the Presidio of Monterey Chapel Sept. 11, St. Jerome became inducted as the patron saint of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and of military linguists. St. Jerome, who lived from 347 to 420, has been associated with writing, cataloging and translating works of history, biographies, and biblical translations and is traditionally regarded as the most learned of the Latin Fathers. Therefore it is fitting that he be chosen as the patron saint of linguists, according to Chaplain Maj. Chan-young Ham, DLIFLC command chaplain. “St. Jerome was dedicated to his work as a translator and linguist. He was disciplined and he believed in what he was doing, pushing himself to be an expert in language and the understanding of them,” said Ham. “He was internationally influenced,” Ham continued. “He traveled the world and respected other cultures, while dialoging with many to discuss scholarship and the truth.” The tradition of patron saints as guardians over areas of life, to include occupations, dates back to as early as the fourth century. Linguists now join with other military career fields who have followed in this tradition. St. Michael, paratroopers, and St. Barbara, field artillery, are examples of military occupations that have previously inducted a patron saint. Father George Khoury, associate professor of Levantine at the Institute, inducted St. Jerome at the Presidio Chapel and blessed the pendants with holy water, which were then given to all in attendance. He and Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of DLIFLC, unveiled the St. Jerome icon that will be displayed in...
Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – More than 200 members of all four branches of the services and Department of Defense civilians attended a three-day Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug. 29-31. The workshop was opened by DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Wiley Barnes, who welcomed the CLPMs, whose job is to help linguists maintain and improve their foreign language skills and advise them in their career paths. “Take advantage of this workshop…build relationships across services and agencies, exchange ideas, learn from each other. Don’t accept the status quo, things are always changing. Technology changes, the environment changes, and the enemy gets a vote…we have to adapt,” said Barnes. The large gathering of military and civilian foreign language community managers and leaders served as a perfect venue to give awards for the DOD Command Language Professional of the Year and the Command Language Program of the Year. The winner of the DOD’s best Command Language Program of the Year for 2016 was the Navy Information Operations Command, Maryland. The award was received by the incoming CLPM Chief Petty Officer Vernon “Duke” Smith, who accepted the cup on behalf of the work of CLPM Chief Petty Officer Kate Greifzu and her commander, Capt. J.S. Scheidt. DOD winner of the best Command Language Professional of the year went to Air Force Staff Sgt. Monica Helling, who works for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) at Travis Air Force Base as a Russian Linguist. Completely caught off guard by the recognition in this forum, in an interview Helling admitted that she...
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