Students succeed again in Mandarin speech contest

Students succeed again in Mandarin speech contest

By Siyi (Lois) Gao DLIFLC Asian School I   SAN FRANCISCO – Sixty-eight Mandarin Chinese language students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center participated in the 42nd Annual Mandarin Speech contest in San Francisco April 22, with 31 DLI students winning awards. This year, 415 registered contestants from 38 schools and universities in California participated in this contest, in which the DLIFLC students competed with students from U.C. Berkeley, U.C. Davis, U.C. Irvine, the University of San Francisco, San Francisco State University, and many others. According to the event organizer, the Chinese Language Teachers Association of California, DLIFLC students won a total of 31 prizes including six first-place winners, six second-place winners, four third-place winners, and 15 honorable mentions. Professor Patrick Lin, academic specialist at DLIFLC’s Asian School I, was impressed by the results. “Considering DLIFLC students participated in just 10 contestant groups, this result is really excellent,” said Lin. “DLI students outperformed their rivals from other universities and colleges again this year, showcasing the high quality of our Chinese program, which we are all proud of.  I think there are three factors contributing to our students’ great success in the contest – hard work by our Chinese language faculty, high motivation by our students, and strong support from the school management.” Dr. Janette Edwards, dean of Asian School I, along with 58 Chinese faculty members, attended the speech contest to support the event held at Lowell High School in San Francisco. Edwards was also one of the award presenters during the award ceremony at the end of the day-long event. “I am so pleased, but not at...
Impact most important about DLI, says general

Impact most important about DLI, says general

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, California April 13 to see first-hand the Army’s foreign language training mission. “You can’t look at the size of an organization to determine its importance. You have to look at the size of its impact,” said Lundy in an interview.  “When you look at the number of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines who walk out of these gates with the skills that they have, the things they are going to go out and do will directly inform national-level decisions.” Lundy spent time observing classes in Russian, French and Spanish and spoke to students, of all four branches of the service, about the importance of their studies to national security. “When I spoke to the students, none of them said it was easy,” said Lundy, exiting a Russian language classroom where students were a bit more than half way through their 47-week course. During a working lunch with the DLIFLC Provost, management and the eight deans of the 17 languages currently taught at the institute, Lundy wanted to specifically address them to explain the significance of their work within the larger context of the military and national defense. “One of the main points I wanted to drive home is the impact they (instructors) have on our nation….it is not just our Army or our Joint Force. When you think about the importance of our Soldiers out there, one of the key things we have to...
From DLI to VP in Procter & Gamble’s Eastern European division

From DLI to VP in Procter & Gamble’s Eastern European division

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Imagine being a private in the U.S. Army at the Defense Language Institute in 1969 learning Russian. Then imagine using a two-track reel-to-reel tape recorder weighing about 20 pounds, along with another 20 to 30 pounds of books. Now fast forward, and imagine being a vice president for one of Procter & Gamble’s first manufacturing plants and newest subsidiary in Eastern Europe. If you are a DLI graduate, this could be your destiny. “Graduating from the Russian Program at DLI was the hardest thing I have ever done in my life,” said Bill Harter, who graduated from Columbia University Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor degree in Slavic Languages in 1975. Three months later, Harter got a job with P&G which led him to traveling around the world, to promote some of the products our lives would be impossible to imagine without: Ivory soap, Pampers, Mr. Clean, etc. “I traveled throughout Central Europe, Turkey, the Balkans, Central Asia, and picked up a few more languages such as German and some Dutch,” said Harter. With the fall of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of East and West Germany, Harter found himself jettisoned once again into Eastern Europe, right in the middle of the Czechoslovak Velvet Revolution in late 1989, when most Eastern European nations were freeing themselves of the then Soviet Union’s oppressive control. “I am very proud of the Rakona manufacturing plant acquisition. We negotiated with the then Czechoslovak government for about 18 months and P&G became the first company to acquire 100 percent of a government owned business…via special...
Institute names its 2016 Teacher of the Year

Institute names its 2016 Teacher of the Year

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Zhenshuai Liu, a chairperson in the Chinese Mandarin School, is the teacher of the year for 2016 at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. His success has also earned him the 2017 Allen Griffin Teaching Award, given in May by the Community Foundation of Monterey County to outstanding educators for secondary and post-secondary education. Liu was recognized for exceeding excellence based upon several criteria. Liu arranged target-language-only cultural classes to discuss Chinese history, culture and current events in Chinese. He also prepared authentic teaching materials by collecting the most-updated Chinese news and most-current materials for students. He then carefully organized the materials into a recommendation list for reading on a daily basis for students. From playing games to graphic stories, Liu contributed to students’ motivation through engaging learning activities. His excellent lesson designs inspired one student to comment, “Every class of his is so elaborately prepared that every session is a masterpiece.” Liu tailored everything he could for his students, including tailored homework, quizzes, and one-on-one activities. Liu’s professionalism proceeds him as eight out of 12 students graduated with honors or high honors, including the Commandant’s Award. Liu also received the Army Achievement Medal for Civilian...
FAOs and Special Operations bring benefits to country teams

FAOs and Special Operations bring benefits to country teams

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Lt. Col. Gordon Landale from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey spoke to Foreign Area Officers in language training at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center March 15 about U.S. Army Special Operations and how it can work within a country team to advance U.S. priorities. A country team is the foundation of a U.S. Embassy and includes many interagency personnel to promote diplomacy abroad. Some country teams are further augmented by the National Guard’s State Partnership Program. Special operations, which include U.S. Army Special Forces, Psychological Operations and Civil Affairs, can bring even more capabilities to the team, according to Landale. Landale, with special operations experience in various theaters and joint task force duties with NATO, began his 21-year career as an infantry officer before going to Special Forces selection in 2001. During the qualification course he trained in a mock embassy, but it would take 15 years before he stepped foot into a real embassy in Tajikistan. “Without the Defense Attaché, I would not have known what to expect,” said Landale, speaking about the importance of interoperability. U.S. Government agencies along with the departments of State and Defense must collaborate to achieve U.S. priorities in a given country under the Integrated Country Strategy – the ambassador’s multi-year plan that articulates those priorities. Peacetime engagements by special operations go hand-in-hand with the diplomatic relationships built by FAOs. Special operations has a diverse portfolio and are used for...
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