DTRA Europe director mentors FAOs

DTRA Europe director mentors FAOs

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Col. Mike Ashford, director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Europe, spoke Sept. 8 to Foreign Area Officers in language training at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center who will assume future assignments in Europe. Ashford spoke briefly about DTRA Europe and its conventional duties concerning weapons inspection teams, which include linguists and FAOs. He also spoke about DTRA’s duties under the Vienna Document, which provides openness and transparency concerning military activities conducted inside the territory of all European and Central Asian participating states. Ashford specifically wanted to use his visit to offer encouragement to the FAOs while they are still young in their careers. He himself is a FAO, having served in Moscow and U.S. Africa Command, attended the Joint Military Attaché School in Washington, D.C., and taught at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. “I highly encourage you to get into a job with a high concentration of FAOs. That gives you a much better opportunity at promotion,” said Ashford about career advancement. He spoke about the military downsizing, making it difficult for FAOs to compete for promotion due to spending time away from the service, usually at an embassy or other foreign assignment. “But learn your profession before you try to go to the pointy end of the spear,” he added, as it takes experience before FAOs will be solving serious diplomatic problems. Being that the FAOs are currently in language classes at the institute, mostly Russian, Ashford encouraged them saying that “language proficiency as a FAO is important. It’s one...
75th Anniversary Special: Language buildup

75th Anniversary Special: Language buildup

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – In 1946 the Military Intelligence Service Language School moved from Fort Snelling, Minnesota, to the Presidio of Monterey, California. The school almost went to Japan, but was declined by Gen. Douglas MacArthur who did not have the facilities and recognized that service members would not serve full tours due to the postwar drawdown. The Presidio of Monterey was the better option as it previously served as the Civil Affairs staging area for troops deploying to the Far East as part of the occupation forces. Although Japanese was the main focus in language training at first, the single-language MISLS became the multi-language Army Language School. The Army added several languages in the years following World War II. Shortly after the relocation, the military started recruiting native speakers of European and Asian languages. Each language department’s history is unique and these languages were added, to some effect, as a result of the rapidly changing military needs of a postwar world. Col. Elliott Thorpe, the school’s commandant, recognized the need for understanding the Russian-speaking world. In September 1946 the school hired a graduate student from Stanford University, Gleb Drujina, to join two other instructors to form a Russian class. Their first class began with eight students in January 1947. The looming threat of the Soviet Union and communism would see Russian grow vastly into the largest program during the Cold War. The Truman Doctrine of March 1947 stated that the U.S. should give support to countries or peoples threatened by communism. This would keep the U.S. vested in Europe and the Far...
DLIFLC announces Hall of Fame nominations

DLIFLC announces Hall of Fame nominations

  By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center has announced that it will induct seven more members into its Hall of Fame on Nov. 4, 2016. The selectees for 2016 are: Maj. Gen. James A. Adkins, a 1976 DLIFLC Russian course graduate; Robert Destatte, a 1966 Vietnamese course graduate; Dr. Claude O. Proctor, a 1959 Russian course graduate; Pardee Lowe, an expert in foreign language proficiency level testing; Dr. Donald C. Fischer, former commandant and provost of DLIFLC; Gail McGinn, former Department of Defense senior language authority; and Walter Scurei, DLIFLC friend and benefactor, donor of the Berlin Wall Monument and backer of a scholarship for spouses and children of DLIFLC graduates. The DLIFLC Hall of Fame, established in 2006, honors those persons who have contributed significantly to language training or use within the Department of Defense. A summary of the selectees’ accomplishments will be published in the Globe magazine. This year’s ceremony will also mark the Institute’s 75th Anniversary which will be celebrated on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016, at the Monterey Hyatt Regency, starting at 6 p.m. For more information on attending the 75th Anniversary Ball, please go to www.dli-foundation.org For more information about previous inductees into the DLIFLC Hall of Fame, please go to our home page at...
Former CIA agent says language and culture knowledge essential to national security

Former CIA agent says language and culture knowledge essential to national security

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Frank Archibald, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency National Clandestine Service from May 2013 to January 2015, spoke to faculty and staff at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug. 18. Archibald spoke about how language and culture has helped him throughout his national security career and offered encouragement to the teachers in getting their students to achieve higher proficiency levels. “Individuals in relationship to the state are more powerful today than they ever were before and that is because of technology,” Archibald said, and he held out his cellphone. He talked about how people are more connected today than ever before. “Technology can be a power for good or a power for evil.” Throughout his career Archibald’s work focused on international relations between states such as that between the Soviet Union and the U.S in the Cold War, but today individuals are becoming more powerful through the connectivity of technology. Therefore, he stressed, the importance of understanding relationships down to the individual, and with that comes the thorough understanding of language and culture. “When I was in Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo), once a month I would go places in the east where they haven’t had anybody from the Embassy in decades.” said Archibald, and then, following one particular trip, “one of the linguists said to me ‘Frank, you’re always so much better in French the day you come back from your trips to the east.’” These trips are how Archibald dealt with language and culture understanding in his career. Previous to his address...
Alumnus works to preserve unit’s history

Alumnus works to preserve unit’s history

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Andrew Rodriguez, a December 1990 graduate of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, found his calling restoring a signal intelligence aircraft to memorialize the unit he served in as a Spanish linguist. Rodriguez entered the U.S. Army Reserves in 1984 and was assigned to the 138th Aviation Company, tasked with airborne signal intelligence missions. In 1990 he attended DLIFLC. “When I was at DLI, I think there were a lot of questions why Spc. Rodriguez was taking Spanish,” he jokes, referring to his Spanish last name. “But it was clear I didn’t speak a word. I think the professors were harder on me as a result, which of course made me better.” After language training, Rodriguez returned to the 138th Aviation Company. Because he was at DLIFLC at the time, he did not deploy to the Persian Gulf with the unit during the 1990-1991 conflict. Instead, he used his linguistic skills on counter narcotic and other missions until he left the Army in 1997. “I’m most proud of the fact I got to work and say goodbye to the Soviet Brigade in Cuba,” said Rodriguez of his time in service, recalling the ex-Soviet military unit that left Cuba in 1993. Now, Rodriguez is the president of the 138th Aviation Company Memorial, a non-profit organization formed by the unit’s veterans from Vietnam to Desert Storm, which looks to memorialize the signal intelligence unit’s 33-year mission. The 138th was activated in Da Nang, Vietnam, in 1966 and inactivated on April 10, 1999 in Florida. “We are restoring one of the...
75th Anniversary Special: The Savage and Snelling years

75th Anniversary Special: The Savage and Snelling years

From the Military Intelligence Service Language School Album 1946 Edited by Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Summary: This article consists of excerpts from the MISLS Album 1946, which covers the period from 1942 to 1946 when the language school relocated to Camp Savage, Minnesota, in 1942 and later Fort Snelling, Minnesota, in 1944. Highlights include the introduction of a collegiate system, expansion of the curriculum to include Chinese and Korean in 1945, and even more training of linguists in Japanese for the period of American occupation of Japan after World War II. In June of 1946 the school moved from Fort Snelling to Monterey, California, and was renamed the U.S. Army Language School. Battle experience proved that intelligence corps men were essential, and the War Department fully acknowledged the importance and the need of a Military Intelligence School. It was then that the War Department decided to place the intelligence school under its direct jurisdiction. The first official MISLS class began in June 1942 with 200 men. The initial Savage class represented little change from the curriculum at the Presidio of San Francisco School. It was not until the second class got under way in December 1942 that the school began to take on its special characteristics as a center of instruction in military Japanese. It has been found that to expect students to obtain a grasp of both military and general-usage language was to demand too much of them, and with the second Savage class, the stress was laid on the military side. The third class opened in the summer of 1943, after the entire school system...
Page 11 of 34« First...910111213...2030...Last »