Awards presented for DoD’s Command Language Program of the Year and Professional of the Year

Awards presented for DoD’s Command Language Program of the Year and Professional of the Year

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif., – The Commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Col. Phillip Deppert, and Command Sgt. Maj. Matildo Coppi, presented awards Sept. 1 to the winners of the Department of Defense’s best Command Language Program and Command Language Professional of the Year. “I am honored, and even more humbled to be here today to present these awards. You as individual Language Program Managers, and the organizations you represent really make up a ’team of teams,’ that keep the entire Defense Language Program alive and vital. It could not happen without each and every one of you. I couldn’t be prouder of what you do.” said Deppert. Members of all four branches of the Services and DoD civilians gathered at DLIFLC’s Weckerling Center, at the Presidio of Monterey, to attend the Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held from Sept. 1-3, during which the awards are traditionally presented. Each year, more than 150 foreign language program managers attend the course to glean knowledge about the trends in foreign language acquisition and new products offered to military service members to better maintain and improve their foreign language skills. “There is no end to the language pedestal,” said Cheryl Houser, National Security Agency Senior Language Authority and guest speaker at the event. “Just as you get to the top, the bar will rise. And you will be surprised at how you will make it over the top every time.” The winner of the DoD’s best Command Language Program of the Year was the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command’s 500th Military Intelligence...
TRADOC deputy talks culture and language at DLIFLC

TRADOC deputy talks culture and language at DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Lt. Gen. Kevin W. Mangum, the deputy commanding general and chief of staff of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Eustis, Virginia, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Sept. 2. “There is a lack of language proficiency in the Army. Having men and women who better understand the culture, and certainly speak the language, as we engage populations across the world is critical,” said Mangum, during his first time visit to the institute since he was appointed to his new position at TRADOC in 2014. “Language is the driver to understanding a culture,” Mangum said, as he commended the native-speaking DLIFLC faculty who already provide a level of cultural awareness as they teach language in the classroom. A career aviator, with overseas deployments to Korea, Honduras, the Persian Gulf, Turkey, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq, Mangum recognizes the crucial role that cultural training and language familiarization play for the warfighter. “With the outreach programs that DLI has, we could certainly provide better cultural awareness and some basic language skills to the operating force,” said Mangum. “We must make them more culturally aware and provide as much regional expertise as we can.” Turning from cultural awareness to training more proficient professional linguists, Mangum spoke briefly about the value of overseas immersion training opportunities and the benefit students gain from the experience. “It’s one thing to sit in a classroom at the Presidio of Monterey and talk about other cultures and languages, but putting it into context and perspective in the...
Air Force Special Operations School commandant learns about DLIFLC

Air Force Special Operations School commandant learns about DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Lt. Col. Daniel Roesch, U.S. Air Force Special Operations School commandant, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Sept. 1. The Special Operations School, located at Hulbert Field, Florida, consists of four divisions, one being a language center, which shares the mission of DLIFLC – to provide culturally based language education. Roesch visited DLIFLC to learn how the institute operates and possibly learn new ways to better provide foreign language training to meet the Air Force’s language requirements for special operations forces. “It’s great to see all of this from the top down. As a Japanese student in 2009-2010 I, of course, was at the bottom looking up,” said Roesch. During his visit senior DLIFLC leadership briefed Roesch on the institute’s goals to reach higher proficiency levels, distance learning capabilities and online learning materials. He also toured the Directorate of Continuing Education and learned about isolation immersion opportunities. “We had no Japanese immersions in my time here,” said Roesch, who later spent time in Japan after DLIFLC. “Just having that immersion experience brought my (language test) score up a plus, so I know it’s helpful.” On Sept. 2, Roesch visited his old stomping grounds, the DLIFLC Japanese department where he spoke to several of his instructors and addressed a class of Japanese language students. “This is a great opportunity for you, take advantage of it, and maintain your language. When you graduate, you will be at the top of your game, and it will be up to you to make sure that...
Advanced Language Academy for senior academic leaders

Advanced Language Academy for senior academic leaders

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, conducted the Advanced Language Academy (ALA) seminar for senior academic leaders at DLIFLC and sister institutions Aug. 10-21 to stay abreast of the changing contexts of higher-level language learning. Dr. Betty Lou Leaver, DLIFLC provost, kicked off the two-week seminar. “We are in a post-method era,” said Leaver. “Emphasis is now on meeting students where they are and ‘transforming’ them into proficient language users through diagnostically oriented teaching and the development of autonomous learning skills.” Leading experts in the foreign-language learning field presented at the academy as guest speakers. Consultant Mike Mears spoke about leadership and management. He described how great teachers share the same attributes as great leaders and used Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, who taught at West Point, as an example. Dr. Dan Davidson, president of the American Council for International Education, the flagship program in language education, and professor at Bryn Mawr College, spoke about “teams that lead students to achieving higher levels” as part of the session on supervising at upper levels. Upper-level learning in an overseas setting, led by Dr. Davidson and Jelena Teague of the DLIFLC Immersion Language Office, was also a topic of discussion. DLIFLC conducts immersion language training at more than 20 sites outside of the U.S. Students who have gone on immersions say that it improves confidence and motivation in using the language, and these students generally score higher on their final language proficiency test. DLIFLC recognizes the value that immersions bring to language learning, but also recognizes that it is...
Korean language students perform for Cultural Day

Korean language students perform for Cultural Day

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Korean language students studying at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, California, performed a traditional Korean fan dance at the 23rd Korean Day Cultural Festival at Union Square in San Francisco Aug. 15. Buchaechum, as the dance is known in Korean, uses large fans painted with pink blossoms and the dancers represent birds, flowers, butterflies and waves. The students learned the dance on their own time as the intensive Korean program is 64 weeks long requiring seven hours of class per day, with two to three hours of homework each night. “At the normal pace, it takes three months to learn and master the basic traditional dance techniques and to perform the fan dance on stage,” said You-chung Kim, the executive coordinator of Korean culture at DLIFLC’s Korean school. “It can take a year, not only to teach students how to dance, but it also (takes time to) design choreography, select and edit the music for the dance and arrange proper traditional Korean dresses for the stage.” Kate Hwang, the Korean dance director, has taught students fan dance since 2002. Her belief is that students can be motivated and reach higher language goals when they are more immersed in the culture. For the past 13 years, Hwang has taught hundreds of students how to perform the fan dance. The festival was hosted by the Korean American Association of San Francisco and Greater Bay Area. This year the festival also commemorated the 70th anniversary of Korean Independence Day and the 60th anniversary of the Korean American...
Office of Standardization and Academic Excellence opens at DLIFLC

Office of Standardization and Academic Excellence opens at DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, California, opened the Office of Standardization and Academic Excellence Aug. 13. The new office was established to help the institute to achieve its mission, which is to graduate proficient linguists to enhance national security. Col. Phil Deppert, DLIFLC commandant, and Col. Keith Logeman, assistant commandant, cut the ribbon officially opening the office. In his remarks, Deppert spoke about the importance of standardization in the military and for the academic institution. He also said that DLIFLC is embarking on a decade of “firsts” as the institute is looking at the way ahead. Col. Ginger Wallace, former assistant commandant, now at the Pentagon, was also instrumental in helping to establish the office, but her change of command took place before the opening. “Congratulations on getting to this day. I know a lot of people worked hard to establish this office and I am glad to know that it has been finally realized. I firmly believe it will be key in taking an already outstanding institution to even greater accomplishments,” said Wallace. DLIFLC is a large scale organization with a variety of practices and procedures within the various directorates. As the mission requirements increase, identifying best practices in teaching and leadership, and standardizing routine functions across schools will enable academic leaders to focus on implementing innovations and maximizing language teaching and learning. DLIFLC is regarded as one of the finest schools for foreign language instruction in the world. The Institute provides resident instruction in 23 languages to approximately 3,500 military service members,...
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