Navy celebrates 40th anniversary of anchor drop

Navy celebrates 40th anniversary of anchor drop

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – About 50 Sailors, leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio of Monterey. The U.S. Navy officially formed a detachment for their students at the Presidio in 1976 under the leadership of Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, who attended the brief ceremony aside the anchor. In 1972, Rakfeldt arrived in Monterey as the Naval Security Group liaison and the highest ranking Navy officer on the Presidio. “At that time we had 68 personnel. Some were over here. Some were over there,” said Rakfeldt pointing to various buildings on the Presidio. “Some were living with the Army.” By 1975 there were more than 100 Sailors when a rear admiral from Washington, D.C., arranged for them to form a detachment. Beginning as the Naval Security Group Monterey, it has changed names over the years and today it is the Center for Information Dominance Unit. As the first commanding officer, Rakfeldt wanted the Navy detachment to “mark its territory.” He learned of an anchor sitting on the beach at the Naval Postgraduate School, also in Monterey, and arranged to have it moved. “Shortly thereafter the first ever anchor on the Presidio of Monterey was set into a bed of concrete in front of the barracks. The United States Navy was here to stay and firmly anchored,” said Rakfeldt. The anchor was set in place July 14, 1976. Rakfeldt retired from the U.S. Navy on July 31. One detail Rakfeldt forgot when he...
DLIFLC opens new Language Training Detachment in Germany

DLIFLC opens new Language Training Detachment in Germany

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   GRAFENWOEHR, Germany – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, headquartered in Monterey, California, opened a new language training facility at the Combined Arms Training Center, or CATC, in Vilseck, Germany on April 7. The official name of the DLIFLC center is the Combined Language Arms Training Center. The addition of foreign language training at this site will augment the current 67 courses taught at CATC and will provide military and civilian linguists throughout the U.S. European and U.S. Africa Command the opportunity to receive foreign language training closer to their home duty stations. “The leadership understands there is a need for growth in our language professionals. They also understand that in this region the best way to develop partnerships is through cultural and language understanding,” said Col. Keith M. Logeman, DLIFLC assistant commandant, referring to talks he conducted with USEUCOM and USAFRICOM leaders. “This effort was a true definition of teamwork,” said Lt. Col. Jeffery Hollamon, the CATC director. “It took less than a year to put this entire project together. CATC coordinates and provides individual training and professional education for U.S. Army Europe Soldiers, Department of Army and host nation civilians, as well as multinational partners with readiness training before deployment. Though several sites throughout Europe had been considered for the language training needs, CATC had ideal conditions for student attendance, including dormitories and dining facilities. One of the big advantages of the Vilseck location is that the entire facility is already dedicated to military training activities for civilians, Soldiers and multinational students. With more than 17,000 individuals trained at...
Tagalog teacher favors DLIFLC after meeting linguists

Tagalog teacher favors DLIFLC after meeting linguists

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – It is an unseasonably hot day in April on the Presidio of Monterey, California, and Marites Castro’s students are jumping off desks. The Tagalog language teacher does not discourage them. She shouts praises and encourages them to keep going. “Last year we did a bamboo traditional Singkil dance originating from the Lanao provinces located in Mindanao, southern Philippines, but this year we will do the bench dance. It will be very good. You’ll see,” said Castro, who teaches the most common language of the Philippines. About a month away is Language Day, the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center’s annual open house and showcase for multiple languages and cultures from around the world. Students practice in their spare time a dance or custom from the culture they are studying to present on Language Day. “These students are new, but on Language Day they’ll be ready,” said Castro. Castro, who is from Manila’s metropolitan area, loves teaching so much that she left her home and her close-knit family in the Philippines for the U.S. so that she could teach Tagalog. “My parents were very into education. They valued it and no matter how simple life was, they wanted us to get to college,” said Castro, who has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Santo Tomas and a law degree. She was working on her thesis for a Master of Arts in Special Education at the University of the Philippines prior to coming to the U.S. “It is a value in the Philippines that you help one another,” Castro...
AETC commander visits linguists in Monterey

AETC commander visits linguists in Monterey

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – The commander of the Air Education and Training Command visited Airmen at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center March 29, as a part of a tour of one of the 23 major units he oversees in 14 states. “I am very impressed with what you are doing here with these young Airmen,” said Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson, AETC commander, to Air Force leaders of the 517th Training Group at the Presidio of Monterey. There are currently more than 1,000 Airmen studying at DLIFLC, many of whom are first-term Airmen. Roberson, accompanied by his wife, Cheryl and Chief Master Sgt. David Staton received a command brief from DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Keith Logeman. He gave details of the type and rigor of foreign language training Airmen receive in the 26 to 64 week courses, depending on the difficulty of the foreign language. “Our goal is to have motivated Airmen and give them the language of their choice (whenever possible),” he said. “Currently, we have eight undergraduate schools and our instructors are mainly foreign-born,” said Logeman. He explained that more than 60 percent of the Airmen go through a military headstart program upon arrival, that refreshes their English grammar, teaches them study techniques, and offers an introduction of culture for the language they will learn. Roberson had the opportunity to visit with the 311th and 314th Training Squadrons where he met with essential staff and presented several Airmen with coins. Staff Sgt. Ryan Best, a Chinese Military Language Instructor, Staff Sgt. Donisha Lewis, a logistics specialist, and Capt. Kamisha Reeb, associate dean...
Silver Star Award Ceremony

Silver Star Award Ceremony

By Amber K. Whittington DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – After 44 years, and the persistence of an Army major, two Vietnam veterans received the Silver Star Medal on March 8, at the Presidio of Monterey in the historic Weckerling Center. Retired Col. William Reeder Jr. and retired Chief Warrant Officer 4 Daniel Jones, both Army helicopter pilots during the Vietnam War, were presented with the third highest award exclusively for combat valor by Congressman Sam Farr. The award was initiated by retired Army Maj. John Duffy from Santa Cruz, California, whom the two saved during their heroic actions in Vietnam during one of the most infamous battles in Vietnam, in Kontum Province, at the Battle for Charlie. During the fight, ground forces were heavily outnumbered and under attack by heavy artillery and small arms fire. Reeder and Jones took out several lethal guns all while under intense fire from multiple anti-aircraft positions. After leaving the battle to rearm and refuel, Reeder and Jones’ team volunteered to return to engage the enemy, when they faced even worse conditions with low clouds, smoke, haze and darkness fully setting in. The heroic contributions of the two pilots lead to the escape of a dozen friendly forces and Maj. John Duffy, who was an advisor to the South Vietnamese Army. Reeder thanked everyone who came to honor him and Jones at the ceremony, but gave an emotional word of gratitude to his special guest for the event Ke Nghiem. “As we are being thanked for what we did, I need to thank Ke for what he did, to save my life,” said Reeder to the crowd....
Retired general recalls largest military sex scandal

Retired general recalls largest military sex scandal

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Retired Maj. Gen. Robert Shadley spoke at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, California, about sexual harassment/assault response and prevention during the institute’s quarterly SHARP training Feb. 19. “I speak to groups about eradicating the cancer of sexual harassment and assault from their organizations,” said Shadley to about 250 Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines at the Post Theater. Shadley, the former commander of the U.S. Army Ordnance Center and School, then located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, unraveled the largest military sex scandal to date in 1996. Known as the “Game ala military,” an entire network of senior instructors were in competition to prey on young female trainees at the ordnance school. “We found that it was easy to cut down on trainee-on-trainee misconduct, but one day a first sergeant intercepted a love note from a trainee to her drill sergeant,” said Shadley. The investigation that followed had a snowball effect, eventually leading to charges against officers and enlisted Soldiers around the U.S. including Sgt. Maj. of the Army Gene McKinney, the highest-ranking enlisted Soldier. In 2010, after believing that little has improved in preventing sexual harassment and assault in the military, Shadley wrote a book, The GAMe – Unraveling a Military Sex Scandal, about these incidents at Aberdeen. “If you take care of your people, reward the good and correct the bad, the mission will be achieved and you and your organization will succeed,” said Shadley. Shadley was followed by skits from each of the services with winners receiving a copy of his book....
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