FAO program guest speaker on US-Korea Alliance

FAO program guest speaker on US-Korea Alliance

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Retired Korean Maj. Gen. Lee Seo-young, now a professor at the Korea National Defense University, spoke about the alliance between the U.S. and Korea to students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Feb. 10. Lee gave his presentation, titled the Republic of Korea – U.S. Alliance: Past, Present and Future, to students at the institute’s Asian School II in Korean and then again later in English to the Foreign Area Officers. Speaking to the FAOs, “You are the experts between the U.S. and the country in which you serve,” said Lee, who served as a Defense Attaché for Korea in Washington, D.C., where he often worked on issues related to the alliance. Korea and the U.S. have maintained a bilateral Alliance for more than 60 years. Born out of the Korean War, the alliance grew stronger, both during and after the Cold War. Today, both nations “go together,” as their slogan suggests, to meet the security challenges of Northeast Asia. Beginning his presentation, Lee spoke about what he learned while researching alliances. “Most alliances last no more than 10 years,” said Lee. “The Republic of Korea – U.S. Alliance has lasted for 60.” In the first stage of the alliance during the 1950-1953 Korean War under the United Nations Command, Gen. Douglas MacArthur commanded all U.N. forces fighting in Korea. Afterwards, Seoul and Washington signed a mutual defense treaty authorizing further stationing of U.S. troops in Korea....
TRADOC commanding generals says DLIFLC is an example for Army University

TRADOC commanding generals says DLIFLC is an example for Army University

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed Gen. David Perkins, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Eustis, Virginia, to the Presidio of Monterey, California, Feb. 9. Perkins visited a classroom in the institute’s Middle East I school where he interacted with some of the students who are learning Arabic. Afterwards, he spoke about DLIFLC as an example in the upcoming Army University, which will be a premier learning institution that prepares Soldiers and civilians to win in the future security environment. “Something we are trying to increase and propagate in the Army is that we want you to continue your education and your level of self-development,” said Perkins. “For the rest of your life we want you to build tools to stay connected to the community of learning, and I think DLIFLC is really setting a great example of how we do that.” Since 2002, service members attending the institute have been able to earn an accredited Associate of Arts degree in foreign language upon successful graduation from their program. Nearly 12,000 associate degrees have been awarded since DLIFLC became accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The Army has succeeded in making it possible for students to receive the two-year college degree with 45 DLIFLC credits and 18 units transferred from other accredited institutions or authorized sources. “In many ways, DLIFLC is a part of an example we want to propagate throughout the rest of the Army in that...
Former DLIFLC instructor speaks about UN

Former DLIFLC instructor speaks about UN

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Kim Sung-lim, a former Korean instructor at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and now a security coordination officer within the department of safety and security at the United Nations, returned to DLIFLC to speak about the U.N. Jan. 28-29. Kim spoke about the role of the U.N. in monitoring the human rights situation in North Korea and presented on the first day to Foreign Area Officers and Military Language Instructors and the second day with students attending the institute’s  Korean school. “There is no parallel in the contemporary world to the level of human rights abuse in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” said Kim. For decades, North Korea has remained at the top or near top of all measures of state repression. The U.N. General Assembly has condemned North Korea for human rights abuses annually since 2003. “The U.N. is expected to be impartial even as a humanitarian agency, but in some cases it must execute justice,” said Kim, who feels very strongly about human rights abuses in North Korea. Human rights abuse is only one of many issues the U.N. must deal with on North Korean. A nuclear test was detected in the north of the country in early January. The U.N. Security Council quickly held an emergency meeting at the request of South Korea and decided to increase economic sanctions against the North. In 1945, the U.N. was established to prevent war, but it approved use of force in two situations: Korea in 1950 and Iraq in 1990. North and South Korea signed an...
Retired general encourages FAOs in language learning

Retired general encourages FAOs in language learning

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center hosted the Joint Foreign Area Officer Course Jan. 25-29 at the Weckerling Center on the Presidio of Monterey, California. FAOs, who come from the four branches of the U.S. military, are regionally focused and are considered experts on political-military issues. Once their FAO training is completed, they are expected to serve as defense attachés, security cooperation officers and political-military planners worldwide. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Matthew Brand spoke about the language enabled FAO Jan. 28. He served as a defense attaché in the Republic of Georgia and is a Russian linguist. He also served as the former deputy chief of staff for strategic plans and policy at NATO, his final assignment. “We are training you in this language so you can talk to people. You cannot get access to somebody if you can’t speak their language,” said Brand. “The most important tool in your kit is your language.” As part of their training path, a FAO could spend anywhere between 26 weeks to 64 weeks in class, seven hours per day at DLIFLC studying a foreign language. “The most important person you should know is yourself,” said Brand, who recommends that the FAOs become familiar with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator questionnaire to assist in their language learning. In theory, Myers-Briggs determines how humans process information and which of the four psychological functions is dominant for one person most of the time – sensation, intuition, feeling and thinking. “How does this apply to language learning? One thing we all have in common...
Danish military looks to train more linguists at DLIFLC

Danish military looks to train more linguists at DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Members of the Royal Danish Defence College Institute for Languages and Culture in Copenhagen, Denmark, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Jan. 25-27. The U.S. and Denmark, both NATO countries, support each other in the field of language training and education through NATO’s Bureau for International Language Coordination. “As part of that partnership, DLIFLC helps them with teaching materials and other learning resources that they can use in their classrooms,” said Detlev Kesten, associate provost for academic support at DLIFLC. Kesten said that the Danes plan to send about half a dozen students to attend the DLIFLC Dari Basic course this summer. This will be the first time students from Denmark have attended DLIFLC since 2013. Though the Danish military has modeled some of DLIFLC’s best practices in teaching, nothing can replace the highly skilled native-born instructors who teach at the institute in Monterey. From 2007 to 2013 nearly 40 Danish students graduated from the 47-week Dari and Pashto courses. During the visit, the Danish delegation learned about DLIFLC’s teaching methods, use of technology in the classroom and testing methods, as they visited the institute’s Continuing Education Directorate Jan. 26. They observed an Arabic and Pashto class Jan. 27. The Danish military’s language school conducts a two-year military linguist program in Arabic, Russian and Persian, and is also responsible for English and French language instruction for Danish cadets and officers. DIFLC provides resident instruction in 23 languages with the capacity to instruct another 65 in Washington, D.C., graduating more than 200,000 linguists since...
Admiral, DLIFLC graduate speaks to FAOs

Admiral, DLIFLC graduate speaks to FAOs

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center hosted the Joint Foreign Area Officer Course Jan. 25-29 at the Weckerling Center on the Presidio of Monterey. FAOs, who come from the four branches of the U.S. military, are regionally focused and are considered experts on political-military issues. Once their FAO training is completed, they are expected to serve as defense attachés, security cooperation officers and political-military planners worldwide. Rear Adm. Todd Squire, director for international engagement, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., spoke briefly about the FAO role in security cooperation Jan. 26. Squire defines security cooperation as DOD interaction with foreign defense establishments to build relationships that promote specific U.S. interests. “It sounds daunting, but at the end of the day, it’s really not that hard,” said Squire. Squire said that a good beginning is to understand the U.S. codes and recommend that FAOs learn these among other policies. Security assistance under Title 22 is a Department of State responsibility and security cooperation under Title 10 is a Department of Defense responsibility. Between State and DOD, Squire echoed what many speakers at this and previous Joint Foreign Area Officer courses said – FAOs have many bosses and to get used to that, but to remember that the ambassador is the President’s direct representative in a foreign country and the closest at hand. However, not everything is just work. Squire also wants FAOs to enjoy the experience of being a FAO as he enjoyed all of his assignments abroad. He is a two-time...
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