Berkeley cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

Berkeley cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Soldiers from the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, the U.S. Army element at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, conducted a leadership panel with Army ROTC cadets from the University of California, Berkeley, March 16. “The Army’s future is bright, indeed, as Berkeley’s cadets continue their education and prepare for commissioning,” said Lt. Col. Toni Sabo, commander of the 229th. During two hour-long panels, third and fourth-year cadets, known as Military Science III and IV, engaged in conversations with Army officers and NCOs from the 229th for the purpose of gaining mentorship. “The cadets asked insightful questions about leading in today’s Army,” said Sabo. “As MSIII and MSIV cadets, they already appreciate the importance of building strong relationships with the NCOs who form the backbone of our Army and who are the first line leaders of our junior-enlisted Soldiers.” DLIFLC and the 229th have deepened cooperation between the active duty and several San Francisco Bay Area Army ROTC programs such as those at Santa Clara University and San Francisco State University. Likewise, cadets from Berkeley’s Golden Bear Battalion had previously visited DLIFLC to learn more about linguistic related careers in the Army, including the Foreign Area Officer career field, which is something cadets could strive for when they earn the rank of major. Army ROTC started with 35 initial programs in 1916 that also included Berkeley. Historically, Berkeley has been commissioning U.S. Army officers as far back as 1870. The Army ROTC program today came into being with the passage of the National Defense Act of...
DLIFLC successfully concludes regional accreditation visit

DLIFLC successfully concludes regional accreditation visit

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Following two years of painstaking work on the Institutional Self Evaluation Report for the reaffirmation of the Institute’s accreditation, faculty, staff and leadership of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed 10 members of the accrediting commission March 6-8, who spent several days interviewing staff and students about academic practices and procedures. “At the end of their visit, the team reported that they were extremely impressed with the teaching and learning they observed and noted that the Institutional Self Evaluation Report was one of the best they had ever read,” said provost, Dr. Robert Savukinas, in a letter to faculty and staff. “Furthermore, they were going to take several things they learned from DLIFLC back to their colleges to help them improve their teaching and administrative processes, “explained Savukinas. As part of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the team came to validate DLIFLC’s Institutional Self Evaluation Report. Team members came from community colleges located throughout California and Hawaii. The team included two college presidents, two chief academic officers/provosts, and two chief student support officers, a dean of library and learning resources, a chair of language arts, a director of fiscal and administrative services, and a faculty member. During their exit report, attended by faculty, staff, and leaders, DLIFLC received seven preliminary commendations and four preliminary recommendations based on what the team read in the self-evaluation, witnessed in classrooms, and observed in the over 100 meetings with faculty and staff. The preliminary recommendations included: review the processes to identify and allocate...
Santa Clara cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

Santa Clara cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Soldiers from the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, the U.S. Army element at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, conducted a leadership panel with the Santa Clara University Army ROTC unit Feb. 28 in Santa Clara, California. “Our friends from the Defense Language Institute came out here for you,” said Lt. Col. Jason Noble, the professor of military science at Santa Clara, to the cadets. “And that’s because we are a profession that always gives back.” During the two-and-a-half-hour panel the cadets engaged in meaningful and purposeful conversations with Army officers and NCOs from the 229th for the purpose of gaining mentorship and deepen cooperation between the active-duty Army and Santa Clara’s Bronco Battalion. “Everything we do starts and stops with leadership,” said Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of DLIFLC, who also traveled to Santa Clara to speak during the leadership panel. “All of us will tell you we wish we had this type of opportunity when we were in your boots.” Lt. Col. Toni Sabo, commander of the 229th, was inspired by the cadets she spoke with in their willingness to learn about the Army and their choice to serve. “Our visit with the cadets was such a pleasure. They are invested in developing themselves as strong leaders of character and it shows in their thoughtful questions and their insightful observations during our leadership development discussion,” said Sabo. Lt. Col.  Bill Stephens, the staff judge advocate for the Presidio of Monterey, held a special discussion for cadets who were interested in a future in law in...
NETC Force Master Chief Visits IWTC Monterey

NETC Force Master Chief Visits IWTC Monterey

Courtesy Story Center for Information Warfare Training   MONTEREY, Calif. – Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief Mamudu Cole visited Sailors from Information Warfare Training Command Monterey at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, March 1. Cole met with IWTC leadership and students, spoke with the enlisted staff and toured a number of facilities across the Institute, including a classroom where he observed students from all military services learning Mandarin. Cole’s trip featured an all-hands call where he answered questions and discussed the future of the Navy’s recruiting and training pipelines. “This is a great time to be in the Navy,” said Cole. “We are facing a competitive war for talent, and to successfully win this war we must all come together to build a bigger, better and more lethal Navy. We must train our Sailors better, and we must mentor and develop each and every one of them.” As the senior enlisted member of the organization responsible for the Navy’s training pipelines, Cole values the perspective of new recruits who are attending their initial rating training or “A” schools.  His position allows him to take that feedback to his headquarters and shape the experiences of future recruits. “The first thing that struck me about Force Master Chief Cole was his eagerness to engage with staff members at our level,” said Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 1st Class Justin Rivers. “I was impressed that he was so ready to get hands-on with our day to day work, and it was encouraging to hear that many of the changes he described to our training pipeline reflected ideas that I...
Former submariner adds impact at DLIFLC

Former submariner adds impact at DLIFLC

Courtesy Story Center for Information Warfare Training   MONTEREY, Calif. – Students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center are taking charge of their foreign language education under the guidance of a former subsurface engineering officer assigned to Information Warfare Training Command Monterey. Lt. Tony Le redesignated to the Navy’s Foreign Area Officer career field and is now studying Arabic at the DLIFLC alongside new enlisted recruits from all military branches. Despite the differences between the fields, Le has managed to take process improvement skills from the submarine world and apply them to the foreign language classroom. “When I was an engineer, I worked in a unit that was charged with figuring out how to make items user friendly and more intuitive,” said Le. “One time we actually took the cumbersome design of an old-school periscope and replaced it with an off-the-shelf Xbox controller. This planning concept is no different.” The process, called “design thinking,” is a phased approach.  Participants begin by identifying elements of the current situation that can be improved. They then break out into timed brainstorming sessions where they focus on solution-based ideas.  Ideas are then built up, iterated on, or discarded in subsequent phases. By the end of the session, Le’s group had several ideas for innovation in the classroom ranging from increased use of media to three-way translation. These will be implemented on a small scale to see how they work, and if successful, may be considered for wider adoption. “These young Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines have some really great ideas. Most of them are brand new to the military so they...
Adding relevance and rigor to NCO professionalism

Adding relevance and rigor to NCO professionalism

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The U.S. Army NCO Creed states that “No one is more professional than I,” and to elaborate on recent initiatives to improve NCO professionalism, Command Sgt. Maj. David Turnbull, the command sergeant major of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, spoke at the Presidio of Monterey Feb. 23. “As we looked at NCO professional development we wanted to add relevance and rigor to make the curriculum applicable to what our NCOs are doing now and in the future,” said Turnbull, as he spoke with NCOs of the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion assigned as platoon sergeants, military language instructors, trainers or other leadership positions at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. The Army continues to modernize professional military education in order to improve the quality of training, development and schooling that Soldiers receive. The NCO Professional Development System is designed to help the Army achieve its NCO 2020 Strategy, which establishes ends, ways and means for developing the current and next generation of NCOs. NCOPDS is not new. It began as the NCO Education System in 1971. Part of this effort places an emphasis on providing the outstanding training and education needed to conduct complex missions in the future. To achieve this, NCOs need “quality curriculum, quality facilities and quality instructors,” said Turnbull. Emphasizing instructors, Turnbull spoke about the Army Instructor Badge. As an incentive the Army developed the badge in 2014 to professionalize Army instructors and enhance their standing. “Here at DLI you have Military Language Instructors and they’re extremely professional NCOs. The instructor...
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