Top DoD official says DLIFLC the premier foreign language provider

Top DoD official says DLIFLC the premier foreign language provider

10/27/2014 By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, Jessica L. Garfola Wright, says that the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center is the premier language provider to the Department of Defense, not only for resident instruction but also online foreign language training materials. “When I first came here I thought, ‘well they teach just a little bit of language.’ I have had only a few hours here and I am thoroughly impressed with the in-depth quality and professionalism of what they do here,” said Wright in an interview Oct. 22.”They (DLIFLC) not only teach more than ‘a little bit’ of language, they teach you to be proficient in the language and they teach multiple levels of that language, with phenomenal web-based programs to maintain your language skills,” said Wright in an interview. Accompanied by Stephanie Barna, acting Assistant Secretary of Defense Readiness and Force Management and Sgt. Maj. Michael Schultz, the senior enlisted advisor for USD(P&R), Wright received a tour and briefing Oct. 22,  from DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Ginger Wallace.Wright is a senior DoD official and the principal staff assistant and advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense for Total Force Management regarding readiness, National Guard and Reserve component affairs, health affairs, training, and personnel requirements and management. A part of Wright’s portfolio is also DLIFLC and the DoD foreign language training mission.Impressed by an Urdu class, Wright praised both the students and classroom instructor. “The interaction that I saw between the instructor and the students was just amazing. She was very knowledgeable, she was very professional, and she...
Presidio dedicates building to Medal of Honor recipient

Presidio dedicates building to Medal of Honor recipient

PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, Calif. — More than 100 people turned out for the ribbon cutting and dedication of the Presidio of Monterey’s newest instructional building in honor of a Medal of Honor recipient and language graduate here Oct. 17. Building 618 is now known as “Cook Hall,” in memory of Marine Corps Col. Donald G. Cook. The building was officially opened after a ribbon-cutting ceremony outside the building followed by a dedication ceremony inside. During the ribbon-cutting event, Presidio of Monterey Garrison Commander Col. Paul Fellinger, U.S. Rep. Sam Farr and Cook’s son Thomas Cook cut the ceremonial ribbon. Then, at the end of the dedication event, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Commandant Col. David Chapman and Farr and Cook’s daughter Victoria Spalding unveiled a bronze plaque of Cook. In addition to the participants, both events were also attended by other Cook family members and friends, state and local officials and military community members. Marine 1st Lt. Donald Cook attended the Army Language School, the predecessor to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, and graduated near the top of his Mandarin Chinese class in 1961. In December 1964, Cook became the first Marine captured in Vietnam. And, eventually, Col. Donald Cook, posthumously, would become the recipient of this nation’s highest military honor: the Medal of Honor. The building dedicated to Cook is a 110,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility, using the latest energy- and water-conservation technologies. It is one of the most environmentally friendly structures on the Presidio. For example, all the rainwater that lands on Cook Hall is collected and stored in large underground cisterns. The water...
2014 Ready & Resilient Campaign

2014 Ready & Resilient Campaign

09/05/2014 DLIFLC and Presidio of Monterey kick off Ready and Resilient campaign The Presidio of Monterey kicked its Ready and Resilient wellness campaign Sept. 4 with the signing of a suicide prevention proclamation, a buddy pledge, a prayer for the fallen, and a moment of silence.The proclamation and buddy pledge was signed by Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Commandant Col. David Chapman and Presidio of Monterey Garrison Commander Col. Paul Fellinger, accompanied by DLIFLC Command Sgt. Maj. Matildo Coppi and Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Wynn.“What is the essence of this day today?” asked rhetorically Chapman. “After nearly 13 years of conflict and the continuous deployment of our service members into harm’s way, the Army, and other Services, realized that the resilience of the force has weakened,” he explained to some   4,000 service members studying foreign languages at DLIFLC.“We realize there is a stigma surrounding seeking help… and to change a culture or behavior, we must all work together. We must look out for each other and use the buddy system – intervene when necessary,” Chapman told the audience, mostly ranging between 18 and 23 years of age.Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States and has become a growing concern among military leaders. “All branches of the military are affected by suicide. The attitude toward seeking help will change when leaders convey the message that asking for help is not a sign of weakness but strength,” stated the narrator Sgt. Amy Cho. Thirty eight vendors were present at the wellness fest half of which were booths containing information on how to seek help...
Combined Arms Center general says the need for linguists will grow

Combined Arms Center general says
the need for linguists will grow

09/11/2014 By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif., – The commanding general of the Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., says the future of the military lies in better education, more cultural awareness and language skills training, and the ability to prevent conflict and shape outcomes that lead to peaceful solutions.”We are going to look to do interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (activities) and so the need for linguists is going to increase, and certainly the need for cultural understanding is critical,” said Lt. Gen. Robert Brown, during a visit to the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug. 21 where he observed service members studying Turkish and Urdu.”Right now we have Soldiers deployed in 152 countries around the world. They are out there preventing conflict, they are shaping, deterring those who would do us harm. They are better prepared to work with allies and multinational forces and the Defense Language Institute has a huge role in that,” said Brown.Just before deploying on a joint exercise to Japan last year, Brown said that he was fortunate to receive language and culture training for his Soldiers at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., where DLIFLC has a Language Training Detachment. “I think that trying to understand their culture better was key and that not just coming in like the ugly American, if you will, saying ‘here is what we do’ and ‘listen to us – we know everything.’  Understanding their culture and showing that respect drew us closer together so that we really had a strong relationship,” Brown explained, adding that as 1st Corps commander his area of responsibility was the...
DLIFLC students compete in 39th Annual Mandarin Speech Contest

DLIFLC students compete in 39th Annual Mandarin Speech Contest

SAN FRANCISCO — Service members studying Mandarin Chinese at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, made the trek north to test their skills and compete for honors at the 39th Annual Mandarin Speech Contest in San Francisco April 26. The day-long competition, the largest of its kind in the United States, is sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association of California, or CLTAC, and was held this year at the Lowell High School auditorium. The purpose of the speech contest is to foster good language skills in Mandarin. The CLTAC, established in 1962, is a nonpolitical, nonprofit educational and professional organization that seeks to promote the study, teaching and research of the Chinese language and culture and provides a platform for Chinese instructors to share and exchange teaching experience, ideas and information. The annual speech contest rewards excellence in speaking and comprehension. Although it is one of the six official languages of the United Nations, and spoken by more than 1.3 billion people worldwide, Mandarin is considered exceptionally hard to learn for western language scholars, in part due to the fact that few speakers of Mandarin emigrated from China until the late 20th century, and its spoken complexity, which relies on tone to determine a word’s meaning in a sentence. Competitors were divided by age group and required to be students enrolled in a Mandarin Chinese program during the 2013-2014 academic year. Also, as a prerequisite, all contestants passed through a rigorous preliminary contest in their own school in order to compete. The competition required students to deliver a speech, which they wrote, memorized and...
Col. Danial Pick, DLIFLC Commandant, retires

Col. Danial Pick, DLIFLC Commandant, retires

Col. Danial D. Pick, the Commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, has retired from the military after 29 years of service in the Army in a ceremony held on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey April 18. Pick is retiring after an illustrious career where he served as a military intelligence officer at various unit levels to include command. He became a Middle East Foreign Area Officer in 1996 and served multiple tours in the region. A graduate of the DLIFLC Basic Arabic course, he speaks Arabic, Persian-Farsi, Persian-Dari and Assyrian. He served as the director of the Army’s Foreign Area Officer program at the Presidio prior to taking the position of DLIFLC commandant. The incoming DLIFLC commandant is expected to assume command on May 22. Pick is expected to stay in the Monterey Bay area where he lives with his...
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