Russian delegation visits DLIFLC

Russian delegation visits DLIFLC

Russian Federation Maj. Gen. Elena Knyazeva, the deputy chief of Science and Training of the Military University Ministry of Defense, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Nov. 21, with a group of Russian military educators who wanted to learn more about how their U.S. counterpart teaches foreign languages. “It is a great honor to be here,” said Knyazeva, recounting that she knew, while she was a military language student in Moscow, that a U.S. counterpart existed in Monterey. “We were always curious to know what our colleagues were doing in the field and what types of achievements they had made,” she said with a smile. “Coming here is like a dream come true.” Army Lt. Col. Jason Weece, the director of the Institute’s Foreign Area Officer Program, briefed the Russian visitors about the DLIFLC mission and responded to the many questions about the length of courses, linguist attrition rates, and the use of technology in the classroom. The visitors had an opportunity to visit a basic and advanced Russian course, speak with experts in the fields of faculty and curriculum development, and view a demonstration of the last foreign language materials used for distance online learning by linguists around the world. The visit to Monterey came a day after the Russian delegation spend a day touring the Defense Language Institute English Language Center in San Antonio, Texas, where U.S. and foreign service members are trained to improve their English language proficiency skills. Story and Photo Credits Story and photos by Natela Cutter, Mission PAO Photo: Col. Vladimir Dekhtyarev, Col. Grigory Yakovlev, Maj. Gen. Elena Knyazeva, and Lt....
229th Soldier wins local Rising Star competition

229th Soldier wins local Rising Star competition

Sgt. Scott Harris, representing Company B, 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, walked away the winner of the 2012 local Rising Star competition at the Hobson Recreation Center here Oct. 25, touting a trophy and a check. “I’ve been singing my entire life, but never won a contest,” said Harris, who explained that he had played in cover bands for corporate parties, large benefit events, and even Las Vegas. “There were a lot of good people in the show. It was nerve wracking. (We had) a lot of talented singers and people who have passion and are good at what they do” said Harris, adding that there was no room for error during the competition that started in September. “You had to be good every single week. … It was humbling to be around them.” A native of Virginia Beach, Va., Harris comes from a long line of musicians on both sides of his family. “My grandmother was choir director; my father’s brother was a professional drummer. It is in my blood,” said Harris, explaining that his music career during a 17-year gap in military service gave him the opportunity to open for bands and musicians such as Lonestar, Willy Nelson, and John Fogerty. Operation Rising Star is the Family Morale, Welfare and Recreation’s “American Idol” style singing competition for service members, families, and Department of Defense civilians. The five finalists also included Pfc. Greg Norris, Pfc. Anthony Elliot, Airman 1st Class Jillian Grode and Marine Cpl. John Varkados. They appeared before community members who encouraged all performers while showing their support for their favorite performer. Operation Rising Star is Army...
Student receives Soldier’s Medal for saving life of fellow diver

Student receives Soldier’s Medal for saving life of fellow diver

A Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center student received the prestigious peacetime Soldier’s Medal award Oct. 18 for having saved the life of a local man in a diving accident that took place on Sept. 8, 2012, in the Monterey Bay area. Staff Sgt. Eric J. Meas earned the medal for his actions in rescuing a fellow diver after Meas noticed that the diver had lost consciousness at the depth of 50 feet. Without regard for his own short air supply, Meas was able to bring the diver to the surface where he administered rescue chest compressions and emergency breathing until help arrived. “It gives me tremendous pride to recognize Staff Sgt. Eric Meas for his heroic actions. It is not often tested to the level he was (in the accident), said DLIFLC Commandant Col. Danial D. Pick. “It is what every one of us needs to be doing every day – taking care of our buddies, inside the classroom and out.” Meas received the award during Organization Day at the Institute, in front of more than 4,000 service members standing in formation on Soldier Field. The Soldier’s Medal is awarded to a U.S. service member or of a friendly foreign nation who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Army, distinguished himself or herself by heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy. “We had decided to do a deep water dive to 105 feet that day,” said Meas, recounting the events of the day. Meas had been paired with Dave Neely that day, a fellow diver whom he had met through the Advanced Open Water Course....

Air Force pilot receives Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor

A Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center student was recognized Oct. 17 with the Distinguished Flying Cross for his heroic actions in Afghanistan in December 2012. Air Force Capt. Charles C. Napier is credited for saving the lives of three critically wounded U.S. Soldiers in an Afghan village west of Kandahar by skillfully maneuvering his rescue helicopter and placing it between enemy and friendly forces thereby blocking close-range intense small-arms fire. “It was an honor to award Capt. Napier the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor during our Air Force Wingman Day,” said Col. Ginger Wallace, the commander of the Air Force 517th Training Group and assistant commandant of DLIFLC, referring to the afternoon long event that promotes peer support, team building and resiliency. “It was very fitting to begin the event by recognizing an airman who demonstrated tremendous courage to protect his aircraft and successfully rescue coalition Soldiers while facing enemy fire,” she explained, to the applause of hundreds of Airmen. Aside from the Distinguished Flying Cross with valor, Napier received the Air Force Combat Action Medal, and his 16th Air Medal. Napier graciously accepted his awards, but insisted he was only doing his job. “This was a total surprise. I would not have expected this (recognition) in my wildest dreams. I am really humbled,” Napier said, adding that “the success of the mission is a result of team work. I couldn’t have done it without my crew members.” But in an interview, Napier divulged some of the details about the complexity of the mission and the real danger that faced the two HH-60G Air Force rescue helicopters and...

Air Force 311th drill team sweeps victory

Members of the 311th Air Force Training Squadron drill team won hands down over their competitors, the 314th AF Training Squadron team, in a quarterly competition that took place on Solider Field Sept. 12, at the Presidio of Monterey and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. “It was like watching an America’s got Talent show with a backdrop of an incredible view of Monterey Bay from Soldier Field, “said Col. Ginger Wallace, who took command of the 517th Training Group and position of DLIFLC Assistant Commandant in June.”This was the first time I have presided over this kind of an event here. It’s fantastic!” The 311th drill team prepared an elaborate free style routine that included tossing rifles more than 20 feet into the air to be caught seamlessly by another team member, finishing up with a human pyramid constructed with the aid of rifles to form a platform. “We judged three categories,” said Senior Master Sgt. Carol Sligh, who was on the judging panel. “We look at a ‘regulation,’ portion which is a collection of marching movements, then we evaluate their free style routine, where they get to choreograph their own piece, and the third category is called ‘overall’ where we judge dress and appearance and ask questions to test their Air Force knowledge.” Air Force service members who want to participate in the drill team have steep requirements to qualify. “The students have to have a 3.0 in their studies of a foreign language, as well as a record of good conduct at the squadron level,” said Sligh, explaining that the difficulty and length of the 24...

DLIFLC Instructors become new citizens

Ten faculty members of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center became naturalized citizens in a ceremony carried out by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) at the Presidio of Monterey Sept. 5. Four additional family members participated in the naturalization ceremony, though they had automatically become citizens the moment their parents received notification. The process takes place automatically if children are under the age of 18. “The youngest person ever to participate in this ceremony was Ms. Zainab who is six years old. She was so excited about the ceremony and wanted to be there with her big brother and sister,” said Connie Trautman, a DLIFLC Faculty Personnel System staff member who helped coordinate Thursday’s event. “It is a great honor to stand before you today and congratulate you on becoming United States citizens,” said DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Ginger Wallace, who read a short biography of each individual who received a certificate. Naturalization ceremonies are organized jointly by USCIS and DLIFLC each quarter because of the large number foreign instructors the Institute employs. Story and Photo Credits Story and by photos by Natela Cutter, DLIFLC PAO Photo 1: New American citizens pledge allegiance to the flag shortly after becoming naturalized at the Presidio of Monterey Sept. 5, 2013. Photo 2: Assistant Commandant Col. Ginger Wallace hands Zainab her naturalization certificate during a ceremony at the Presidio of Monterey Sept. 5,...
Page 34 of 39« First...1020...3233343536...Last »