Kiwanis Club gives awards to civilian and military faculty

Kiwanis Club gives awards to civilian and military faculty

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – The Kiwanis Club of Monterey honored two Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center faculty at their monthly meeting in downtown Monterey Sept. 13. Dr. Gamal Kalini received the Civilian Instructor of the Year award and Tech Sgt. Ryan Best received the Military Language Instructor of the Year award. The awards are representative of the partnership between the Institute and the greater Monterey community. Kalini, originally from Cairo, Egypt, has worked for the Institute since 2007. “Dr. Kalini is so dedicated to his profession that he regularly shares his research and work with colleagues through workshops and presentations at various faculty development events at DLIFLC and beyond,” said Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of the Institute. Best, who joined the U.S. Air Force in 2006, studied both basic and intermediate Mandarin Chinese at the Institute before becoming the Chief Military Language Instructor at the Institute’s Asian School I, the Chinese School. “Aside from all his accomplishments, Tech. Sgt. Best also holds the highest DLPT score within the Air Force, with a 3+/3/2+ in Chinese Mandarin – which puts him in the top one percent of Air Force linguists,” said Deppert. Kiwanis International was founded in 1915 by a group of businessmen in Detroit, Michigan. The name “Kiwanis” was coined from an expression in a Native American language of the Detroit area, “Nunc Kee-wanis,” which means, “We trade.” In 1920, the motto of Kiwanis became “We Build.” It remained the motto until 2005, when members voted to change it to “serving the children of the world.” The Kiwanis Club of Monterey, founded...
St. Jerome becomes patron of military linguists

St. Jerome becomes patron of military linguists

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – During a humble ceremony at the Presidio of Monterey Chapel Sept. 11, St. Jerome became inducted as the patron saint of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and of military linguists. St. Jerome, who lived from 347 to 420, has been associated with writing, cataloging and translating works of history, biographies, and biblical translations and is traditionally regarded as the most learned of the Latin Fathers. Therefore it is fitting that he be chosen as the patron saint of linguists, according to Chaplain Maj. Chan-young Ham, DLIFLC command chaplain. “St. Jerome was dedicated to his work as a translator and linguist. He was disciplined and he believed in what he was doing, pushing himself to be an expert in language and the understanding of them,” said Ham. “He was internationally influenced,” Ham continued. “He traveled the world and respected other cultures, while dialoging with many to discuss scholarship and the truth.” The tradition of patron saints as guardians over areas of life, to include occupations, dates back to as early as the fourth century. Linguists now join with other military career fields who have followed in this tradition. St. Michael, paratroopers, and St. Barbara, field artillery, are examples of military occupations that have previously inducted a patron saint. Father George Khoury, associate professor of Levantine at the Institute, inducted St. Jerome at the Presidio Chapel and blessed the pendants with holy water, which were then given to all in attendance. He and Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of DLIFLC, unveiled the St. Jerome icon that will be displayed in...
Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – More than 200 members of all four branches of the services and Department of Defense civilians attended a three-day Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug. 29-31. The workshop was opened by DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Wiley Barnes, who welcomed the CLPMs, whose job is to help linguists maintain and improve their foreign language skills and advise them in their career paths. “Take advantage of this workshop…build relationships across services and agencies, exchange ideas, learn from each other. Don’t accept the status quo, things are always changing. Technology changes, the environment changes, and the enemy gets a vote…we have to adapt,” said Barnes. The large gathering of military and civilian foreign language community managers and leaders served as a perfect venue to give awards for the DOD Command Language Professional of the Year and the Command Language Program of the Year. The winner of the DOD’s best Command Language Program of the Year for 2016 was the Navy Information Operations Command, Maryland. The award was received by the incoming CLPM Chief Petty Officer Vernon “Duke” Smith, who accepted the cup on behalf of the work of CLPM Chief Petty Officer Kate Greifzu and her commander, Capt. J.S. Scheidt. DOD winner of the best Command Language Professional of the year went to Air Force Staff Sgt. Monica Helling, who works for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) at Travis Air Force Base as a Russian Linguist. Completely caught off guard by the recognition in this forum, in an interview Helling admitted that she...
MLIs play important  mentoring role for linguists

MLIs play important mentoring role for linguists

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – When Sgt. First Class Brandon Tinling graduated from his Modern Standard Arabic course about 15 years ago, he didn’t exactly know what lay ahead for him. He thought he may end up working in a cubicle, diligently chipping away at Arabic translations and analysis. Instead, he ended up deploying four times. “One day in Baghdad, while I was sitting outside on my break, one of the gate guards came running up to me to take me back over to the gate where a frantic Iraqi woman was screaming and crying. I quickly found out that her daughter had been kidnapped earlier in the day. We were able to pass that information on to the Iraqi police and they were able to find the child within 24 hours,” said Tinling. Today, as the Chief Military Language Instructor at Middle East III, Tinling runs, together with the civilian leadership, a school of about 100 teachers, eight Military Language Instructors, and several hundred students of all four branches of the service. The kidnapping in Baghdad took place just a year after his graduation in 2004, and is one of the favorite stories he tells students because it illustrates how knowledge of a foreign language saves lives. “The role of MLIs is vital at Defense Language Institute because we have been out in the field and we know what awaits these young men and women when they get out there,” explained Tinling, speaking about the mentorship role MLIs play in the schoolhouse, in addition to teaching some 10 hours per week, grading papers, tracking test results,...
IMCOM general gives advice to Team Monterey

IMCOM general gives advice to Team Monterey

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – Lt. Gen. Kenneth R. Dahl delivered opening remarks at a meeting at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug, 22, sharing his thoughts with Team Monterey members, a gathering of local Department of Defense organizations and Monterey County representatives. “Take advantage of other people’s talents. Come together and find that common ground,” he urged, adding that cooperation between the community and military organizations saves money and enhances community relations. Dahl said it was his second visit to Monterey, where he was impressed by the “Monterey Model,” whereby the City of Monterey provides maintenance services to several local DoD organizations. “This is such a good model,” he said, explaining that it is his responsibility to examine innovative cooperation models between the military and civilian organizations and then try to have similar models implemented elsewhere. “It is important that we focus on what we do best, and let others do what they know best.” The Team Monterey group, founded by former Congressman Sam Farr, is now headed by Rep. Jimmy Panetta, who is interested in facilitating communication and cooperation between the entities in his district. Dahl, who is in charge of 75 active military installations under U.S. Army Installation Management, or IMCOM, encouraged participants to seek ways to improve cooperation that would benefit the entire community. Organizations represented included the Naval Postgraduate School, the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center, the U.S. Coastguard and Defense Manpower Data Center, alongside representatives of local cities in the Monterey county...
FAO program guest speaker on North Korea’s nuclear ambitions

FAO program guest speaker on North Korea’s nuclear ambitions

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   Editor’s note: This article is a feature from the Foreign Area Officer program’s monthly U.S. Army officer professional development series at DLIFLC. MONTEREY, Calif. – Dr. Wade Huntley, academic director of the Regional Security Education Program at the Naval Postgraduate School, in Monterey, spoke to U.S. Army Foreign Area Officers in language training at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center along with students from the Institute’s Korean School, Aug. 16, about North Korea and its nuclear weapons program. Huntley’s talk came merely two weeks after North Korea’s threat to strike the U.S. Territory of Guam prompting U.S. Secretary of Defense, James Mattis, to say that, “The United States and our allies have the demonstrated capabilities and unquestionable commitment to defend ourselves from an attack,” and also stated that, “The DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) should cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people.” Huntley subtitled his talk “Dr. Strange Kim (Jong Un)… or, how I learned to stop worrying and love the crazy dictator with the bomb.” Kim Jong Un took power in North Korea in 2011 after the death of his father, Kim Jong Il. “Why does North Korea do anything it does?” asked Huntley, who explained that the motives of the world’s most secretive and isolated regime are sometimes baffling. “Most analysts come to a consensus that the primary focus of North Korea is regime survival.” Huntley continued with a detailed lecture on North Korea’s quest to obtain the bomb. Beyond the Cold War South Korea...
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