Egyptian General visits DLIFLC

Egyptian Brigadier General Mohamed Moustafa Kamal Ibrahim Fahmy, the Commandant of the Defense Language Institute of the Egyptian Ministry of Defense, receives a brief about the U.S.-based Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center from Foreign Area Officer Lt. Col. Jayson Weece, May 22. Fahmy has not visited DLIFLC for nine years and says he wants to receive an update on the changes in curriculum and use of technology in the classrooms. Story and Photo Credits Story and photos by Natela Cutter,...

Martial arts experts train Presidio Service Members

Shou Shu, which translates to “fighting way of the beast,” a full-on combat form of martial arts, was taught at the Presidio of Monterey Saturday, 29 March, by 10 black belt instructors, or Shi Gungs, who came from as far away as Lake Tahoe. The Shi Gungs, led by Ray Kriegr from Moore’s Martial Arts in Pacific Grove volunteered their Saturday to teach dozens of Service Members stationed at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. “I wanted to do something to empower people [Service Members] to be able to stand up against something,” said Sgt. 1st Class Stephanie Schafer, the installation Sexual Assault Response Coordinator. Schafer, a black belt in her own right and one of the instructors that day, organized the opportunity to learn these self-defense tactics for anyone who signed up. She also organized two previous sessions in her former role as the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion Sexual Harassment/Assault Response Program representative. According to instructor Brook Moes, Shou Shu “is a SHAULIN kung-fu based [style] but in the early 1900s it came to America, and the Chinese street gangs kind of adapted it for gang warfare.” In an era when you never know what may be lying around the corner, Kriegr shared his reasons for following a path in martial arts, “I truly believe that everybody has a right to defend themselves and should be able to do so to the best of their abilities. … so if I can save one life it’s worth it.” “You need to learn good fundamentals, and [have] a good foundation,” said Kriegr, who demonstrated moves designed to teach the...
The Deputy Judge Advocate General of the Army visits Presidio of Monterey

The Deputy Judge Advocate General of the Army visits Presidio of Monterey

MONTEREY, Calif. – Maj. Gen. Clyde Butch Tate, the Deputy Judge Advocate General of the Army, visited the Presidio of Monterey Office of Staff Judge Advocate April 18 in a bi-annual scheduled visit of outlaying installations that are within his realm of responsibility. Article 6 of the UCMJ requires the general officers of the different services’ JAG Corps to regularly inspect their general court martial convening authorities. “Maj. Gen. Tate and his Command Sgt. Maj. Troy Tyler came to the Installation to visit with my staff to ensure that our law practice is providing excellent service which the multi-service commanders and their service members deserve,” said Lt. Col. Bill Schmittel, the Staff Judge Advocate at the Presidio, who oversees an office that normally includes 10 military and 19 civilian employees. “Within the Army and Department of Defense, it is important for us to have senior leadership in the JAG Corps visit and talk with us about the state of our Corps and significant legal issues concerning sequestration, furloughs, and the force in general,” explained Schmittel. With a beaming smile and firm handshake, Tate visited every office and employee, shaking each person’s hand, addressing them by name, and talking about family members, pets, and hobbies, Tate put a coin in several deserving hands, thanking them for their hard work and dedication. “Thank you for not only doing your job well, but also for allowing me to learn about your job. We get a lot of insights like that, and it is very beneficial for us,” said Tate, in the beginning of an address to about 25 staff members. With the...

Counterterrorism expert gives advice to military language students

The man who leads the State Department’s Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications, Ambassador Alberto Fernandez, visited his alma mater April 17, and gave Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center students some good advice regarding their language studies. “Love it,” and “have patience.” “Cultivate that love for language…It’s like any other relationship. And you have to have patience. Language is something that takes years. It takes decades. It is easy to get frustrated so you have to put in the time year after year and go deep into the language,” he told service members studying Arabic-Levantine. And Fernandez knows this from experience. He is a DLIFLC 1978 graduate of the Arabic Basic Course and a heritage speaker of Spanish. His perseverance and dedication to mastering Arabic led him to getting two degrees in Middle Eastern studies and pursuing a career in public diplomacy. He served at 10 embassies and consulates while with the State Department’s Near East Bureau and his fluency in Arabic allowed him to become the bureau’s spokesman on Arabic language and was a frequent guest in regional Arabic media. “Studying Arabic at DLI certainly influenced my career and launched me into what has been a life-long career in the Foreign Service and essentially working in the Middle East. The Arabic learned here was the beginning of studying Arabic for 30 years and working in Arabic. So for me, it was the most significant educational experience in my career,” Fernandez said. But language is not the only skill Fernandez gained at DLIFLC. “When you speak a language you learn respect and compassion for others. People are people and...
TRADOC general tells students language is “life skill”

TRADOC general tells students language is “life skill”

MONTEREY, Calif., – The deputy commanding general of the U.S. Training and Doctrine Command, LTG David Halverson, told service members studying Chinese at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center that the language and culture training they are receiving will be a “life skill” that will contribute to national security. In a visit to DLIFLC on Feb. 20, Halverson spent a day touring the facilities at the Presidio of Monterey and, in addition to Chinese, observed an advanced Russian Defense Threat Reduction Agency course, watched the interaction of Persian Farsi and Arabic language students in an immersion setting, and received a brief about continuing education through distance learning, as well as predeployment training to the Services worldwide. “It will be a life skill…and you will find that it will change who you are and how you see things… (you will) break down barriers…because today we are very globally connected and we have to make sure that we adapt… and that we apply it (cultural and language knowledge) properly,” said Halverson, addressing students who will be graduating this August after 64 weeks of intensive studies. With Army transformation plans in full swing reflecting the changing geopolitical and strategic environment, TRADOC is the leading Army organization that will be implementing the new concept of Regionally Aligned Forces with the combatant commands via its 32 schools and more than half a million Soldiers trained each year. “We have been at war for the last 12 years. It has been a war of the physical. …We are at that transition (time) here. In FY14 …we will have to be the Army of preparation....

New U.S. Citizens Sworn In

The United States has ten new citizens as of February 7th. The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center’s faculty and their family members were sworn in during a Special Naturalization Ceremony, held at the Presidio of Monterey. The Institute’s commandant, Col. Danial D. Pick, delivered the opening remarks welcoming each new citizen and briefly describing their path towards American citizenship. Section Chief Anita Erfan, from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, officiated the Oath of Allegiance, while USCIS officer Danilo Ayran, who was born in the Philippines, delivered keynote remarks about his own naturalization experience. This was the third such ceremony held at DLIFLC, which was preceded by a USCIS outreach event, held earlier that same day. During the event, USCIS officials were on hand to introduce those interested in becoming U.S. citizens to the process and to answer any general questions. During the one on one segment, attendees at the outreach event could ask USCIS officers personally relevant questions. Almost sixty DLIFLC faculty and staff took part in the outreach event. Story and photo credits Story by Dusan Tatomirovic, DLIFLC PAO 130207-A-1550S-001 DLIFLC Naturalization ceremony, at POM. Photo by Natela Cutter, DLIFLC...
Page 40 of 43« First...102030...3839404142...Last »