French War College language department heads visit DLIFLC

French War College language department heads visit DLIFLC

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Jerome Collin, the dean of the French department at the Ecole de Guerre, Paris, or French War College, and Emilie Cleret, the dean of the English department, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center March 20-22. The French War College is a highly prestigious graduate school for officers within the French Armed Forces and is similar to the U.S. Army War College and those of other services. Training also includes language education in French and English. “It was an absolute pleasure to host faculty members of the French War College. We have been collaborating with their College for about three years now, as a result of meeting them at the annual Bureau of International Language Coordination summits which we participate in,” said Associate Provost of Academic Support, Detlev Kesten. Collin observed French classes being taught at DLIFLC and met with students and faculty, while Cleret attended the DLIFLC Advanced Language Academy. She also presented at the academy on the subject of transformative pedagogy for learners at higher levels March 22. Transformative pedagogy was previously presented by former DLIFLC Provost, Dr. Betty-Lou Leaver, at the BILC conference in Riga, Latvia, May 2016. Students who attend the War College are usually at the mid-point of their career and selected by a competitive admission exam. Once they complete their course work, they usually go on to high level appointments within the French military. Two thirds of the students are French learning English, while the rest are foreign officers learning French. DLIFLC provides resident instruction in 17 languages at the Presidio of...
IWTC Monterey Language Students Experience VQ-1 Static Display

IWTC Monterey Language Students Experience VQ-1 Static Display

Courtesy Story Center for Information Warfare Training   MONTEREY, Calif. – Students from Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Monterey visited Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ 1), March 21. The Whidbey Island-based squadron visited the Monterey Jet Center and provided a static display of an EP-3E Aries II reconnaissance aircraft for IWTC Monterey students attending linguistics courses at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC). Cmdr. Andy Newsome, commanding officer of IWTC Monterey, requested the visit to provide an operational context for the language training the Sailors receive at DLIFLC. “Many of our newest Sailors are unsure of what it means to conduct information warfare in the fleet,” said Newsome. “We feel strongly that by giving our Sailors a glimpse of what their shipmates are doing, we can help increase their motivation to excel in language learning.” More than 100 students and staff members visited the static display and interacted with the aircrew. Seaman Apprentice Zachary Bassett stated that he was inspired by the presence of the other linguists there. “I felt that if they can do it, I can do it too,” said Bassett. “The tour made the idea of going to aircrew feel like more than this mythical legend that your recruiter tells you about and turned it into a tangible goal.” The EP-3E Aries II is a land-based multi-intelligence reconnaissance aircraft based on the P-3 Orion airframe. The aircraft provides fleet and theater commanders worldwide with near real-time tactical signals intelligence and full motion video intelligence. “This is a great experience for the language students,” said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Vinny Cassano. “I spent my entire...
Berkeley cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

Berkeley cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Soldiers from the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, the U.S. Army element at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, conducted a leadership panel with Army ROTC cadets from the University of California, Berkeley, March 16. “The Army’s future is bright, indeed, as Berkeley’s cadets continue their education and prepare for commissioning,” said Lt. Col. Toni Sabo, commander of the 229th. During two hour-long panels, third and fourth-year cadets, known as Military Science III and IV, engaged in conversations with Army officers and NCOs from the 229th for the purpose of gaining mentorship. “The cadets asked insightful questions about leading in today’s Army,” said Sabo. “As MSIII and MSIV cadets, they already appreciate the importance of building strong relationships with the NCOs who form the backbone of our Army and who are the first line leaders of our junior-enlisted Soldiers.” DLIFLC and the 229th have deepened cooperation between the active duty and several San Francisco Bay Area Army ROTC programs such as those at Santa Clara University and San Francisco State University. Likewise, cadets from Berkeley’s Golden Bear Battalion had previously visited DLIFLC to learn more about linguistic related careers in the Army, including the Foreign Area Officer career field, which is something cadets could strive for when they earn the rank of major. Army ROTC started with 35 initial programs in 1916 that also included Berkeley. Historically, Berkeley has been commissioning U.S. Army officers as far back as 1870. The Army ROTC program today came into being with the passage of the National Defense Act of...
DLIFLC successfully concludes regional accreditation visit

DLIFLC successfully concludes regional accreditation visit

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Following two years of painstaking work on the Institutional Self Evaluation Report for the reaffirmation of the Institute’s accreditation, faculty, staff and leadership of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center welcomed 10 members of the accrediting commission March 6-8, who spent several days interviewing staff and students about academic practices and procedures. “At the end of their visit, the team reported that they were extremely impressed with the teaching and learning they observed and noted that the Institutional Self Evaluation Report was one of the best they had ever read,” said provost, Dr. Robert Savukinas, in a letter to faculty and staff. “Furthermore, they were going to take several things they learned from DLIFLC back to their colleges to help them improve their teaching and administrative processes, “explained Savukinas. As part of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the team came to validate DLIFLC’s Institutional Self Evaluation Report. Team members came from community colleges located throughout California and Hawaii. The team included two college presidents, two chief academic officers/provosts, and two chief student support officers, a dean of library and learning resources, a chair of language arts, a director of fiscal and administrative services, and a faculty member. During their exit report, attended by faculty, staff, and leaders, DLIFLC received seven preliminary commendations and four preliminary recommendations based on what the team read in the self-evaluation, witnessed in classrooms, and observed in the over 100 meetings with faculty and staff. The preliminary recommendations included: review the processes to identify and allocate...
Santa Clara cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

Santa Clara cadets learn lessons from Presidio Soldiers

By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs   MONTEREY, Calif. – Soldiers from the 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, the U.S. Army element at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Presidio of Monterey, conducted a leadership panel with the Santa Clara University Army ROTC unit Feb. 28 in Santa Clara, California. “Our friends from the Defense Language Institute came out here for you,” said Lt. Col. Jason Noble, the professor of military science at Santa Clara, to the cadets. “And that’s because we are a profession that always gives back.” During the two-and-a-half-hour panel the cadets engaged in meaningful and purposeful conversations with Army officers and NCOs from the 229th for the purpose of gaining mentorship and deepen cooperation between the active-duty Army and Santa Clara’s Bronco Battalion. “Everything we do starts and stops with leadership,” said Col. Phil Deppert, commandant of DLIFLC, who also traveled to Santa Clara to speak during the leadership panel. “All of us will tell you we wish we had this type of opportunity when we were in your boots.” Lt. Col. Toni Sabo, commander of the 229th, was inspired by the cadets she spoke with in their willingness to learn about the Army and their choice to serve. “Our visit with the cadets was such a pleasure. They are invested in developing themselves as strong leaders of character and it shows in their thoughtful questions and their insightful observations during our leadership development discussion,” said Sabo. Lt. Col.  Bill Stephens, the staff judge advocate for the Presidio of Monterey, held a special discussion for cadets who were interested in a future in law in...
NETC Force Master Chief Visits IWTC Monterey

NETC Force Master Chief Visits IWTC Monterey

Courtesy Story Center for Information Warfare Training   MONTEREY, Calif. – Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief Mamudu Cole visited Sailors from Information Warfare Training Command Monterey at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, March 1. Cole met with IWTC leadership and students, spoke with the enlisted staff and toured a number of facilities across the Institute, including a classroom where he observed students from all military services learning Mandarin. Cole’s trip featured an all-hands call where he answered questions and discussed the future of the Navy’s recruiting and training pipelines. “This is a great time to be in the Navy,” said Cole. “We are facing a competitive war for talent, and to successfully win this war we must all come together to build a bigger, better and more lethal Navy. We must train our Sailors better, and we must mentor and develop each and every one of them.” As the senior enlisted member of the organization responsible for the Navy’s training pipelines, Cole values the perspective of new recruits who are attending their initial rating training or “A” schools.  His position allows him to take that feedback to his headquarters and shape the experiences of future recruits. “The first thing that struck me about Force Master Chief Cole was his eagerness to engage with staff members at our level,” said Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 1st Class Justin Rivers. “I was impressed that he was so ready to get hands-on with our day to day work, and it was encouraging to hear that many of the changes he described to our training pipeline reflected ideas that I...
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