Navy celebrates 40th anniversary of anchor drop

By Patrick Bray
DLIFLC Public Affairs


 

Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, the first commanding officer of the U.S. Navy detachment on the Presidio of Monterey, drops anchor outside of the newly established Naval Security Group Monterey in 1976. About 50 Sailors and leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio. (Photo courtesy of retired Lt. Harry Rakfeldt)

Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, the first commanding officer of the U.S. Navy detachment on the Presidio of Monterey, drops anchor outside of the newly established Naval Security Group Monterey in 1976. About 50 Sailors and leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio. (Photo courtesy of retired Lt. Harry Rakfeldt)

MONTEREY, Calif. – About 50 Sailors, leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio of Monterey.

The U.S. Navy officially formed a detachment for their students at the Presidio in 1976 under the leadership of Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, who attended the brief ceremony aside the anchor.

In 1972, Rakfeldt arrived in Monterey as the Naval Security Group liaison and the highest ranking Navy officer on the Presidio.

“At that time we had 68 personnel. Some were over here. Some were over there,” said Rakfeldt pointing to various buildings on the Presidio. “Some were living with the Army.”

By 1975 there were more than 100 Sailors when a rear admiral from Washington, D.C., arranged for them to form a detachment. Beginning as the Naval Security Group Monterey, it has changed names over the years and today it is the Center for Information Dominance Unit.

About 50 Sailors and leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio of Monterey. The U.S. Navy officially formed a detachment for their students at the Presidio in 1976 under the leadership of Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, who attended the brief ceremony aside the anchor. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington)

Retired U.S. Navy Lt. Harry Rakfeldt stands beside the anchor he had placed on the Presidio of Monterey in 1976 shortly after he became the commanding officer of the newly established Naval Security Group Monterey. About 50 Sailors, leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington, DLIFLC Public Affairs)

As the first commanding officer, Rakfeldt wanted the Navy detachment to “mark its territory.” He learned of an anchor sitting on the beach at the Naval Postgraduate School, also in Monterey, and arranged to have it moved.

“Shortly thereafter the first ever anchor on the Presidio of Monterey was set into a bed of concrete in front of the barracks. The United States Navy was here to stay and firmly anchored,” said Rakfeldt.

The anchor was set in place July 14, 1976. Rakfeldt retired from the U.S. Navy on July 31.

One detail Rakfeldt forgot when he was having the anchor moved was to inform the Army. During his retirement the Army leadership of DLIFLC hinted at having the anchor removed, but Rakfeldt was pleased to learn it is still here today and even joined by a second anchor.

About 50 Sailors and leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio of Monterey. The U.S. Navy officially formed a detachment for their students at the Presidio in 1976 under the leadership of Lt. Harry Rakfeldt, who attended the brief ceremony aside the anchor. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington)

Retired U.S. Navy Lt. Harry Rakfeldt stands beside the anchor he had placed on the Presidio of Monterey in 1976 shortly after he became the commanding officer of the newly established Naval Security Group Monterey. About 50 Sailors, leadership from the Center for Information Dominance Unit and Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center celebrated the 40th anniversary April 14 of the U.S. Navy dropping anchor on the Presidio. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington, DLIFLC Public Affairs)



Posted Date: 14 April 2016