Welcome to DLIFLC

DLIFLC is DoD’s premier school for culturally based foreign language education and training, with classroom instruction, mobile training teams, and on-line materials tailored for students at all levels of required proficiency or performance. The institute is attended by all four branches of the military service and select individuals sponsored by their agencies.

Language Day 2017

An estimated 5,000 people attended DLIFLC’s annual Language Day Open House event on Friday, May 12th, on the Presidio of Monterey. It was a fun-filled day with more than 40 cultural performances, dance, song, special presentations and classroom demonstrations.

Alumni

More than 230,000 students have graduated from the Institute and its programs since its inception in 1941 at the Presidio of San Francisco, only six weeks before Pearl Harbor.

New Students

Learn about how to become a linguist at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, one of the most elite educational institutions in Department of Defense.

Employment

Come teach one of more than two dozen foreign languages taught at DLIFLC in beautiful Monterey, California and be a part of one of the largest language schools in the world.

  • News
  • Online Learning
  • Media
  • Journals & Publications

Latest News from DLIFLC


FAO program guest speaker discusses democracy issues in Africa

September 21, 2017

Nicholas Tomb, program manager of the Center for Civil-Military Relations Africa Program at the Naval Postgraduate School, in Monterey, spoke to…

read more...

Kiwanis Club gives awards to civilian and military faculty

September 14, 2017

The Kiwanis Club of Monterey honored two Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center faculty at their monthly meeting in downtown Monterey…

read more...

St. Jerome becomes patron of military linguists

September 13, 2017

During a humble ceremony at the Presidio of Monterey Chapel Sept. 11, St. Jerome became inducted as the patron saint of the Defense Language Institute…

read more...

DLIFLC instructors, family members, become new citizens

September 11, 2017

“Twelve individuals, 10 instructors and two family members became U.S. citizens…”

read more...

Upcoming Events


 DLIFLC Language Day, May 11, 2018,  10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Soldier Field

 

Summer 2017

DLIFLC events throughout the summer of 2017

PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, California -- In celebration of 241 years of American Independence, a 50-gun Salute to the Nation was held on Presidio's historic Soldier Field, June 20. Following patriotic words from Presidio's garrison commander, Col. Lawrence Brown, a roll call of each of the 50 states was conducted in the order they joined the Union. The reading of each state's name and motto was accompanied by the firing of a cannon by the Army Reserve's 75th Pacific Training Division based out of Camp Roberts. The event was open to the public and kicked off Independence Day celebrations for the Monterey Peninsula. Official Presidio of Monterey Web site Official Presidio of Monterey Facebook PHOTO by Steven L. Shepard, Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs. Rep. Jimmy Panetta, California’s 20th Congressional district representative, visits the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey Feb. 22. Panetta learned about the foreign language mission of the Institute and how the installation cooperates with the City of Monterey for maintenance services. (Photo by Patrick Bray, DLIFLC Public Affairs) DOD winner of the best Command Language Professional of the year went to Air Force Staff Sgt. Monica Helling, who works for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) at Travis Air Force Base as a Russian Linguist. By her side, beaming with pride, was Helling's father, Jaroslav Jerzy Fabis, originally from Poland. (U.S. Army photo by Natela Cutter) Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, California, April 13, to see first-hand the Army's foreign language training mission. Lundy spent time observing classes in Russian, French and Spanish and spoke to students of all four branches of the services about the importance of their studies to national security. During a working lunch, Lundy spoke with DLIFLC civilian and military leadership to express his views about the importance of their contributions to the training of the future force. He also addressed DLIFLC Army cadre later in the day, reminding them of their vital role in the development of young Soldiers. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington) The 229th Military Intelligence Battalion kicked off its week of intensive competition for the Platoon Sergeant of the Year at Fort Hunter Liggett's shooting range with a marksmanship assessment, followed by a 4.5 mile ruck march which then took them into a land navigation course. The Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition is a four day event for the "best-of-the-best" putting the competitors through physical and mental tests pertaining to Army knowledge and standards. The 229th Military Intelligence Battalion kicked off its week of intensive competition for the Platoon Sergeant of the Year at Fort Hunter Liggett's shooting range with a marksmanship assessment, followed by a 4.5 mile ruck march which then took them into a land navigation course. The Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition is a four day event for the "best-of-the-best" putting the competitors through physical and mental tests pertaining to Army knowledge and standards. Command Sgt. Maj. David Davenport, the senior enlisted leader for the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, waves with the U.S. Army Special Operations Command Black Daggers Parachute Demonstration Team following their jump into the Presidio of Monterey, California, for Resiliency Day June 16. Davenport traveled throughout TRADOC during the week of the U.S. Army’s 242nd Birthday and concluded in Monterey where he spoke about NCO development and the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center’s future role in the Army’s 2025-2050 timeframe and beyond. (Photo by Patrick Bray, DLIFLC Public Affairs) Col. Wiley Barnes assumed responsibility as DLIFLC assistant commandant, which also includes command of the 517th Training Group July 13, 2017 on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey, California. (U.S. Army photos by Patrick Bray/Released) The Maj. Gen. William H. Gourley VA-DOD Outpatient Clinic in Marina, California, held an opening ceremony Aug. 3. The clinic will begin seeing Veterans and Service Members Aug. 14. Maj. Gen. Gourley helped oversee the restructuring of Fort Ord, California, for civilian use. With this came the idea of the VA-DOD clinic. Following the closing of the fort in 1994, the military community in the Monterey area were without a functioning hospital. Gourley led efforts that eventually culminated in the opening of this VA-DOD clinic. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Bray/Released) The widow of Staff Sgt. Kenneth R. Hobson, II, laid a wreath at the recreation center named after Hobson on the Presidio of Monterey, California, Aug. 4. Hobson died along with 247 others when the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, was bombed by terrorists Aug. 7, 1998. Hobson attended the Arabic Basic Course at DLIFLC from June 1993 to August 1994. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Bray / Released) DLIFLC celebrates 2nd annual Faculty Appreciation Day ~ More than 200 faculty and staff members showed Thursday on Soldier Field at the Presidio of Monterey for a barbecue sponsored by the Command Group in honor of the instructors who work so hard teaching students some 17 different languages. The tradition stated with the arrival of DLIFLC Commandant, Col. Phil Deppert, who says that the "faculty are my troops." (U.S. Army photo by Natela Cutter) DLIFLC commandant, Col. Phil Deppert and Garrison commander, Col. Lawrence Brown, along with several volunteers came to the Presidio of Monterey Cemetery to place American flags at each of the headstones in honor of Memorial Day. The flags will be left at the cemetery throughout Memorial Day week. (U.S. Army photo by Amber K. Whittington)
<
>
Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, California, April 13, to see first-hand the Army's foreign language training mission. Lundy spent time observing classes in Russian, French and Spanish and spoke to students of all four branches of the services about the importance of their studies to national security. During a working lunch, Lundy spoke with DLIFLC civilian and military leadership to express his views about the importance of their contributions to the training of the future force. He also addressed DLIFLC Army cadre later in the day, reminding them of their vital role in the development of young Soldiers. (Photo by Amber K. Whittington)

Basic Language & Culture

  • Rapport
  • Rapport includes six to eight hours of language and culture pre-deployment training. It is mandatory training for all civilian and military Army personnel deploying to Iraq or Afghanistan. Available in Dari, Pashto, Iraqi, Swahili, Hausa, Portuguese, French, Modern Standard Arabic, and Korean.
  • Headstart2
  • Headstart2 is 80 to 100 hours of self-study pre-deployment instruction designed for the training of one small unit leader per platoon. The lessons contain interactive tasks, language-specific pronunciation guides, and cultural familiarization and orientation modules. Headstart2 is available in a stand alone (DVD format) or on-line version.
  • Cultural Orientation
  • Cultural Orientation introduces a given cultural group, combining brief language exchanges with an objective and practical look at daily life in different contexts. Topics include religion, traditions, family life and differences in the lifestyles of urban and rural populations.
  • Countries in Perspective
  • These country studies begin with a country profile containing basic facts, followed by a more detailed discussion on geography, history, economy, society and security.
  • Swahili Familiarization
  • This self-paced, interactive introductory language course in Swahili uses videos and multimedia activities to introduce Swahili language and culture. Topics include: basic greetings, travel phrases, numbers, time, currency, and making appointments, among others.
  • Language Survival Kits
  • Language Survival Kits include text, audio recordings, and translations for up to 3,000 mission-related phrases.
  • Legends & Folktales
  • Short animated stories in English that introduce famous myths, legends, and folktales from cultures across the globe to enhance cross-cultural literacy and provide insight into societies
 

Assessment

  • Online Diagnostic Assessment
  • Take an online test to estimate language proficiency in reading or listening. ODA helps learners determine the subject areas and language specifics to improve, with customized suggestions for GLOSS lessons to help reach proficiency goals.
  • Cultural Awareness Assessment
  • Test your familiarity with a particular society, including geographic facts, major religions, history, security situation, social customs, and basic survival phrases in the dominant language of the region.
DLIFLC produces most of the language materials used for our basic and advanced courses. These products and other language materials are available for pre-deployment training, deployment use and refresher studies. The majority of DLIFLC products are publicly available through this website. View All Resources Here

Language Enhancement

  • Global Language Online Support System
  • GLOSS The Global Language Online Support System offers thousands of lessons in dozens of languages for independent learners to improve their foreign language skills.Lessons are available for intermediate and advanced learners, with the ability to focus on specific topic areas, tailor ed for building listening and reading proficiency.
  • Weekly Training Events
  • Organized in four hour blocks, these in-depth GLOSS lessons are designed to help Command Language Program Managers provide packaged materials to professional linguists.
  • Advanced North Korean
  • These supplementary materials for North Korean dialect language learning can be incorporated into basic, intermediate, or advanced courses to provide students with cultural and regional information about North Korea.
  • Phone Conversations
  • Familiarity with regional dialects and realistic dialogues is key to achieving advanced listening proficiency. This site contains more than 300 casual phone conversations in non-standard dialects of Spanish and Arabic. Arabic materials also include lesson plans for classroom use.
  • Accents Library
  • Available in Spanish and Arabic, this product offers a collection of audio files read in both “standard” language, and in several regional accents to illustrate dialect variations that occur in everyday speech.
  • Arabic Grammar Search
  • Have you forgotten a fine point of Arabic grammar? The Arabic Grammar Search takes you inside the language with complete A-Z search and help functions.

Featured DLIFLC Videos


Journals & Publications

The views expressed in those publications are those of the authors, not the Department of Defense or its elements. The content does not necessarily reflect the official US Army position and does not change or supersede any information in official U.S. Army publications. Editor reserves the right to edit material. Prospective authors should consult previous volumes of the publications and Information for Contributors published in each issue.
GLOBE magazine cover
The GLOBE is an authorized publication under the provisions of AR 360-1 and the Associated Press Style Guide for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of the GLOBE are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army, or DLIFLC. The GLOBE is published by DLIFLC Public Affairs Office.
The DLIFLC General Catalog provides constituencies with precise, accurate and current information to include general information pertaining to DLIFLC, admissions and academic requirements, course descriptions, and major policies affecting students. All catalog years are listed. If the year you need is not listed, please see the catalog prior to that year. Example: If you want to look at information for 2005 courses, see the 2003 General Catalog.

Academic Journals

The mission of Applied Language Learning is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information on instructional methods and techniques, curriculum and materials development, assessment of needs within the profession, testing and evaluation, and implications and applications of research from related fields such as linguistics, education, communications, psychology, and the social sciences.
Dialog on Language Instruction is an occasional internal publication of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC) and part of its professional development program. Its primary function is to promote the exchange of professional knowledge and information among DLIFLC faculty and staff and to encourage professional communication within the worldwide Defense Foreign Language Program.

Registrar

Would you like more information on DLIFLC's Associate of Arts degree in foreign language, graduation certificates, diplomas, awards, and transcript services? Learn More